Saturday, February 10, 2007

RPC=CRC

This morning the Washington Post had a front-page story about staff from the Rockville Pregnancy Center having students chew gum and pass it around in health class.

I had not realized how much the Rockville Pregnancy Center overlaps with the Citizens for a Responsible Curriculum, the anti-MCPS group who are fighting the new sex-ed curriculum.

The RockvillePregnancyCenter.org "About Us" page lists their directors and advisors:
Board of Directors

Marie G. Wheat- President
Walter Harders- Vice President
Ed Anderson- Secretary
Ben Patton- Treasurer
Sandy Hoe- Esq.
Johnson Fan- M.D.

Yes, that would be the Ben Patton, one of the founding members the CRC, one who has addressed the school board many times as their representative.
Advisory Board

Pastor John Bayles, Halpine Church
Jeanne Blocher, Body and Soul Aerobics Founder
Paul Burden, Member
Pastor Nancy Engen, Alpha and Omega Prison Ministries
John Garza, Garza, Regan and Associates, Esq.
Tom Moyer, WAVA Radio
Dr. Robert Norris, Fourth Presbyterian Church
Steven Plaisted, Esq.
Pastors Charles and Dotty Schmitt, Immanuel's Church
Stephen Sparks, Sparks Personnel

Yes, that would be the CRC's lawyer and spokesman, John Garza.

Well, now we have an idea what sex education would be like if they had their way.

Just thought you might find that interesting.

20 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

A couple of similar people involved doesn't equate the organizations. The Rockville Pregnancy Center does important community work. If you start one of your scurrilous campaigns against them, it will backfire on you.

February 10, 2007 3:54 PM  
Blogger JimK said...

The school district has figured them out, and they aren't allowed on any MCPS school grounds any more -- TTF didn't have to do anything. As far as I know, this group is not interesting enough to launch a scurrilous campaign against.

It is certainly significant that key people are in both organizations.

This "important community work?" Tell us, what would that be?

JimK

February 10, 2007 4:28 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

How interesting.

Hey Anon, since when is exposing the truth about who sits on what board a "scurrilous campaign?"

Answer: When somebody wants the truth hidden.

I am glad to find out a bit more about the theocratic fringe lunatics who want MCPS to teach every MCPS student their deeply held, "...unpopular, religious belief that views the homosexual sex acts as sinful..." http://www.mcpscurriculum.com/pdf/StateBOEAppeal.pdf

Daisy

February 11, 2007 8:42 AM  
Blogger andrear said...

Anon, Someone like Ben Patton doesn't need anyone to start a campaign against him. His remarks and behavior at the school board meetings speak for him. You go right ahead and support him but I suggest instead of the BS reparative therapy people like him support- he should get some real therapy.

February 11, 2007 9:54 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

How interesting:

http://mocoprogressive.blogspot.com/2007/02/church-group-disguised-as-pregnancy.html

February 12, 2007 10:03 AM  
Anonymous Aunt Bea said...

Two officers of the CRC are also on the board of the Rockville Crisis Pregnancy Center, where young women facing unplanned pregnancy are offered many services except abortions. Also on the RCPC's board are reps from WAVA where pastor/radio host Don Kroah interviewed a CRC rep (but no TTF rep) early in this controversy and Immanuel's Church where Love Won Out held a recruitment drive last summer that was protested by local clergy.

These groups appear to be some of the fringes of the theocratic conspiracy right here in our community. They hate what they refer to as "the sin of the homosexual lifestyle" and want all MCPS students to be taught that "exclusive" religious view to be sure our schools reinforce the hatred for this "sin" they teach their own kids at home.

These groups support CRC's desire to keep MCPS students from receiving up-to-date information from professional medical and mental health organizations like the AMA in health class (they prefer one 20 year old statement from one former Surgeon General). They want to keep MCPS from teaching students tolerance for their LGBT peers and community members because they'd prefer it if all LGBT people stayed stuffed inside the closet with no hope for their own pusuit of happiness.

Unlike these haters, Montgomery County celebrates our diversity with openly gay elected officials including a State Senator, several State Delegates, and city mayor. The new President of the BOE is a Latina and our new County Executive is the first African American elected to that office after being the first African American ever elected to serve on the Montgomery County Council.

The radical fringe groups don't seem to realize that we celebrate our diversity here in Montgomery County. Hatred is not a Montgomery County value.

February 13, 2007 8:31 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"Anon, Someone like Ben Patton doesn't need anyone to start a campaign against him. His remarks and behavior at the school board meetings speak for him."

What behavior specifically are you talking about?

February 13, 2007 9:43 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"What behavior specifically are you talking about?"

Who specifically wants to know?

February 13, 2007 10:03 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"Two officers of the CRC are also on the board of the Rockville Crisis Pregnancy Center, where young women facing unplanned pregnancy are offered many services except abortions."

Number 1, so what if some people are committed to both missions. The missions are still different.

Number 2, I thought even the most militant feminists agree that abortion is better avoided. RPC facilitates that. What's the accusation here?

"Also on the RCPC's board are reps from WAVA where pastor/radio host Don Kroah interviewed a CRC rep (but no TTF rep) early in this controversy"

I have often heard opposing views on WAVA talk shows. I know I've heard Barry Lynn from AUSCS.

Maybe they just don't consider TTF to be a significant contributor to the debate. After all, they simply support the view of the government. A government spokesman seems the right person to represent that point of view.

"and Immanuel's Church where Love Won Out held a recruitment drive last summer that was protested by local clergy."

Again, so what?

"These groups appear to be some of the fringes of the theocratic conspiracy right here in our community."

The constituencies are completely different. RPS is an evengelical group, with governance by conservative protestant groups. The website's religious content is entirely protestant.

CRC, on the other hand, is inter-denominational and, indeed, inter-religious. The president is Mormon and the leadership has a number of catholics. The website has the viewpoints of all major religious groups stated even including Islam.

And, regardless, where is the evidence of conspiracy in either group?

"They hate what they refer to as "the sin of the homosexual lifestyle""

An orthodox position of all major world religions.

"and want all MCPS students to be taught that "exclusive" religious view to be sure our schools reinforce the hatred for this "sin" they teach their own kids at home."

Actually, most of them would prefer that schools simply stay out of the discussion but if the schools must weigh in, their teachings should be factual and not advocacy.

"These groups support CRC's desire to keep MCPS students from receiving up-to-date information from professional medical and mental health organizations like the AMA in health class (they prefer one 20 year old statement from one former Surgeon General)."

If "these groups" mean RPC, they have apparently worked within the MCPS health education system for years and presented the facts they feel are important. I don't think they taken a position on the curriculum but simply want to do their part to discourage promiscuity. They see the consequences of a valueless sex ed program every day.

"They want to keep MCPS from teaching students tolerance for their LGBT peers and community members because they'd prefer it if all LGBT people stayed stuffed inside the closet with no hope for their own pusuit of happiness."

The school system is out of line in defending certain sexual practices. Students can make up their own mind what they feel is appropriate without NEA input.

"Unlike these haters, Montgomery County celebrates our diversity with openly gay elected officials including a State Senator, several State Delegates, and city mayor. The new President of the BOE is a Latina and our new County Executive is the first African American elected to that office after being the first African American ever elected to serve on the Montgomery County Council."

Equating gay advocacy with the civil rights of minorities is a lunatic fringe concept.

"The radical fringe groups don't seem to realize that we celebrate our diversity here in Montgomery County. Hatred is not a Montgomery County value"

They don't act any different toward gay advocates than TTF acts toward Republicans or conservative Christians.

February 13, 2007 10:35 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"Who specifically wants to know?"

You made an accusation that this guy is engaged is some type of bad behavior. I've met him. He seems like a great guy so I'm surprised that anyone would be saying he's been behaving badly. What's the accusation or was this just another scurrilous attack?

February 13, 2007 10:41 AM  
Blogger Randi Schimnosky said...

Aunt bea said "They hate what they refer to as "the sin of the homosexual lifestyle""

Anonymous said "An orthodox position of all major world religions."

That's the problem anonymous, religion is based on belief without evidence, its irrational and that irrational belief is the primary source of the bigoted belief that its wrong to be gay.

Aunt bea said "and want all MCPS students to be taught that "exclusive" religious view to be sure our schools reinforce the hatred for this "sin" they teach their own kids at home."

Anonymous said "Actually, most of them would prefer that schools simply stay out of the discussion but if the schools must weigh in, their teachings should be factual and not advocacy.".

That's a laugh! You're advocating religious viewpoints be included in schools, viewpoints based on a lack of evidence and now you want to say teachings should be factual - give me a break.

February 13, 2007 12:54 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"That's the problem anonymous, religion is based on belief without evidence, its irrational and that irrational belief is the primary source of the bigoted belief that its wrong to be gay."

That should be "without PHYSICAL evidence", RS. Not many people believe as deeply in materialism as you. I guess not many have the same motive to.

February 13, 2007 6:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"You're advocating religious viewpoints be included in schools"

No one advocates that. The mechanistic logic which says anything religious people believe in is religious is, actually, illogical. Many non-religious people, indeed, probably most, also believe homosexuality is either morally wrong or dysfuntional.

Similarly, religious people believe in gravity. Doesn't make it religious. Doesn't mean we shouldn't teach it.

February 13, 2007 6:05 PM  
Blogger Randi Schimnosky said...

Anonymous, religious people believe without evidence period, physical or otherwise. Anyone can write a book and stick whatever baseless nonsence in it they want. That's the historical nature of religions, they're made up and there is no more reason to believe your religion is the truth than there is to belief the existence of Zeus, Thor, or Apollo is the truth.

Anonymous said "Not many people believe as deeply in materialism as you.".

Anonymous, my income has averaged about $5000 U.S. per year for several years. Obviously I don't believe deeply in materialism, I'd say likely a great deal less than you do. I believe in love and I have the most wonderful loving relationship with my boyfriend. You should wish to have a relationship like mine.

Anonymous said "Many non-religious people, indeed, probably most, also believe homosexuality is either morally wrong or dysfuntional.".

Well, you're wrong about that. I don't have a link, but I've frequently read polls that show it is the religious primarily who wish to oppress gays. Organizations like PFOX, Exodus, Narth that oppose gay happiness are all religious at one level or another. The anti-gay belief is primarily a religious belief. Religion has been so vocal about opposing gays that that is what has come to represent the image of religion - religion is anti-gay.

February 14, 2007 12:56 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Actually, you're wrong, Randi. The most anti-gay people aren't religious. Indeed, most religious people, while upholding the moral principle, still hope and pray for the redemption of gay people.

Here's an interesting piece about ex-NBA star, Tim Hardaway, which demonstrates this (unless you think that NBA players are particularly religious):

"One week after retired NBA player John Amaechi publically identified himself as gay, retired Heat guard Tim Hardaway said on a Miami radio show that he would not want to play with a gay man.

"You know, I hate gay people, so I let it be known," Hardaway said Wednesday, according to a transcript on the Miami Herald Web site. "I don't like gay people and I don't like to be around gay people. I am homophobic. I don't like it. It shouldn't be in the world or in the United States."

Hardaway was a guest on the show and was asked at the end of the interview how he would handle having a gay teammate.

''First of all, I wouldn't want him on my team,'' Hardaway answered. "And second of all, if he was on my team, I would really distance myself from him because I don't think that is right. I don't think he should be in the locker room while we are in the locker room. But stuff like that is going on and there's a lot of other people I hear that are like that and still in the closet and don't want to come out of the closet, but you know I just leave that alone.''

Hardaway doesn't think he's alone in that view, either.

''Something has to give,'' he said. "And I think the majority of players would ask for him to be traded or they would want to be traded...If you have 12 other ballplayers in your locker room that are upset and can't concentrate and always worried about him in the locker room or on the court it's going to be hard for your teammates to win and accept him as a teammate.''"

February 15, 2007 11:56 AM  
Blogger Randi Schimnosky said...

Anonymous, the opinion of one person doesn't say anything about what most people think. And who's to say this guy isn't religious?
Are there non-religious ant-gays? Yes, but the major movement for rejecting gays comes from the religious. The religious are opposed to fairness and equality because of crazy thousands of years old myths. There couldn't be a more unjustified motivation for hatred.

February 15, 2007 1:54 PM  
Blogger Randi Schimnosky said...

Anonymous, I experience anti-gay people regularly. The vast majority of them are religious and even those that aren't justify their bigotry with religion. Religion is at the heart of injustice. It is an "us versus them" philosophy. All religions teach that the world was specially made for their particular group of people - the Jews are gods chosen people, or Islam's "kill the infidels". If we were to eliminate all the conflicts around the world based on religion there'd be virtually no conflict at all

February 15, 2007 1:59 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Amaechi says Hardaway comments show need for more talk about gays in sports

Former NBA center John Amaechi, who disclosed last week he's gay, said anti-gay comments by another retired player "demonstrate the need to continue the conversation."

Retired Miami Heat guard Tim Hardaway said on a radio show Wednesday that he hates gay people, then later apologized for his remarks.

"I don't need Tim's comments to realize there's a problem," Amaechi told The Associated Press in a phone interview Thursday. "People said that I should just shut up and go away -- now they have to rethink that."

Hardaway's comments were sparked by Amaechi's disclosure he's gay.

"You know, I hate gay people, so I let it be known. I don't like gay people and I don't like to be around gay people," Hardaway said while a guest on Sports Talk 790 The Ticket in Miami. "I'm homophobic. I don't like it. It shouldn't be in the world or in the United States."

The host asked Hardaway how he would interact with a gay teammate.

"First of all, I wouldn't want him on my team. And second of all, if he was on my team, I would, you know, really distance myself from him because, uh, I don't think that is right. I don't think he should be in the locker room while we are in the locker room."

If he did find out that a teammate was gay, Hardaway said he would ask for the player to be removed from the team.

"Something has to give," Hardaway said. "If you have 12 other ballplayers in your locker room that's upset and can't concentrate and always worried about him in the locker room or on the court or whatever, it's going to be hard for your teammates to win and accept him as a teammate."

Amaechi also detailed his life, in his autobiography "Man in the Middle," which was released Wednesday. He hoped his coming out would be a catalyst for intelligent discourse.

"His words pollute the atmosphere," Amaechi said. "It creates an atmosphere that allows young gays and lesbians to be harassed in school, creates an atmosphere where in 33 states you can lose your job, and where anti-gay and lesbian issues are used for political gain. It's an atmosphere that hurts all of us, not just gay people."

Hardaway later apologized for the remarks during a telephone interview with Fox affiliate WSVN in Miami.

"Yes, I regret it. I'm sorry. I shouldn't have said I hate gay people or anything like that," he said. "That was my mistake."

Hardaway has reportedly been removed from further league-related appearances.

"It is inappropriate for him to be representing us given the disparity between his views and ours," NBA commissioner David Stern said in a statement to the South Florida Sun-Sentinel.

"Famously, they're saying in 2007 that homophobia is not an issue," Amaechi said. "While (Hardaway) is not a representative of the NBA or of straight men, there's no point pretending it's not an opinion that is out there."

http://www1.wsvn.com/news/articles/sports/MI39877/

February 15, 2007 7:42 PM  
Anonymous Phentermine said...

Nice design of blog.

August 13, 2007 3:22 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

What is really interesting is that Charles Schmitt was forced to resign due allegedly repeated homosexual affairs.

http://www.brentdetwiler.com/brentdetwilercom/charles-schmitts-50-plus-year-history-of-homosexual-sex-with.html


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