Saturday, May 15, 2021

Conservatives Win -- Now What?

So ... you'd think they'd be happy. All year pro-virus Americans have been complaining about how masks were an unconstitutional violation of their God-given liberty, a government imposition on their freedom. Waves of misinformation swept through the covidiot population as, first, they were sure there were government microchips in the vaccine to control our minds (Bill Gates may have put them there, this part was never clear), and then even worse, "vaccine passports" were going to allow the government to track you wherever you went, as Step One toward totalitarianism.

And don't forget, this is all Anthony Fauci's fault, for sumpn-sumpn in Wuhan, communist party etcetera.

For the past year Republicans have demanded the freedom to get sick and to make other people sick. Videos of maskless Karens coughing on customers at Walmart became a cliche, nobody wore masks to Trump rallies and Capitol insurrections -- state or federal -- or even to march around drunk tearing down BLM signs. They wanted to be free and they have been in a state of rebellion ever since the virus first reached the US and public health experts made their recommendations.

I think President Biden pulled off a beautiful political maneuver this week when he and the CDC announced victory over the pandemic in the US, and told people that if they were vaccinated they did not have to wear masks, except in a few situations. He did not impose a "vaccine passport" or tell anybody they needed to carry government-approved identification. He basically smiled at the camera and said, "Have a good time. You're welcome."

You'd think they'd be happy, wouldn't you? Fold up the mask and stick it in the hankie drawer, we're done with those old things. Freedom! We can go to the high-school game and cheer for our team and no libtards will tell us we have to cover our faces.

Of course they are not happy.

First of all, the CDC only said you could go without a mask if you were vaccinated. If you haven't had your shots you are supposed to keep wearing it.

These people had already printed up fake cards claiming to have a medical dispensation that exempts them from wearing a mask. They were already staging riots in the aisles of Costco to demand the rights our Founders gave them, guaranteeing them the freedom to spread disease far and wide. They were not wearing masks or getting vaccinated even when they were asked to. So let's just say there is "some possibility" that conservatives are now going to go around without masks, claiming to have been vaccinated when they are not.

The problem of course is that you can't tell who has been vaccinated and who hasn't. Sure, they give you a little card when you get the shot but one, Republicans are already counterfeiting those, and two, where did I put it again? You go to your kid's game and they ask you if you've been vaccinated, what do you do? You say yes, of course. You don't have to show no stinkin' ID.

According to the CDC, 35.8 percent of Americans have been vaccinated. I am no epidemiologist, but I am pretty sure that <does the math> 64.2 percent of the population is enough to keep a deadly pandemic going. As you know, vaccinated people can still get sick, so the percentage of potentially contagious people is actually higher than that, but let's say two-thirds of Americans are potentially carriers of the novel coronavirus. The point being, the threat is not actually over. The pandemic is wiping out some countries, and it has receded here largely due to vaccinations, but we are not out of the woods. Expect a new surge.

The difference now is that the only people who will get sick are those who wanted to. It's now a personal choice.

I'd say Biden gave the pro-virus Republicans exactly what they wanted. They will be going out without masks and mixing with vaccinated people, and there is no way to know, because Biden totally did not impose government surveillance -- either microchips or passports -- on people. So now Bubba doesn't have to take a shot -- which might, you know, hurt -- or wear a mask, and nobody can tell if he's teeming with viruses or not.

Now our state's Republican governor has even gone a step further. He has announced that as of today, people in the state of Maryland don't have to wear masks whether they are vaccinated or not. So our local Republicans don't even have to lie about being vaccinated (which might take some of the fun out of it).

I'm sure conservatives are cheering. They won. They got what they wanted. No masks, no social distancing, and at least in our state they don't even care if you get the vaccine or not. Just do your thing, man, breathe on your brother, share your microbes with your neighbors, everything's cool.

Actually, I'm sure they are not cheering, because that isn't what they do. They only complain.

And so today the Washington Post front page says: CDC’s mask guidance spurs confusion and criticism, as well as celebration.

Many, including President Biden, hailed the relaxation of restrictions by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as a milestone in the nation’s return to normal. But with a majority of Americans unvaccinated, others questioned the sudden and blanket recommendation, worrying that the onus is now heavier on state and local governments, businesses and individuals to determine whether precautions are necessary.
So yep, the conservatives have what they wanted. Here you got state's rights, as fifty different states get to figure out how to sort these things out, and you also got the free market at work, because basically business owners are going to have to figure out who to let into their venues and who to keep out. The federal government is staying out of all that.

Now the MAGAs can cough on people at Walmart without getting thrown out, and spread disease freely just as the Founders intended.

“The guidance shifts all the burden onto individuals to be ‘on their honor’ and choose the appropriate actions when deciding whether to wear a mask,” said Lisa Maragakis, an infectious-disease epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “There is no way to know who is vaccinated and who is not in most scenarios. The likely result is that almost no one will wear a mask.”
Oh yeah, "honor" is a big Republican value. Uh huh. I'm sure they will be honest about this.

Those of us who stayed home, social distanced, wore masks and managed to stay healthy, those of us who got vaccinated, don't have much to worry about. There is a small chance that we will still get infected, and a tiny chance that the infection will be serious. There is an even smaller chance that a vaccinated person will infect someone else.

So really, I hate to say it, but it's not our problem now. The pandemic is raging, and with unvaccinated people going into crowds without masks you can be sure we will see a spike in infections, but mostly they will only be people who were too dumb to follow the rules. I think most people in nursing homes have had their shots, there are still some vulnerable populations -- ICE detainees, prisoners -- but now anyone can walk in and get vaccinated any day of the week. At this point nobody is telling you what to do, the virus needs hosts and you are free to volunteer to be one.

125 Comments:

Anonymous State vaccination rates falling along political party lines said...

An analysis of the states with the highest and lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates to date shows a stark partisan divide.

The 20 states with the highest rates of residents who have received at least one vaccine dose all went to Joe Biden in last year’s presidential election, while 19 of the 21 states with the lowest vaccination rates supported Donald Trump.

Vaccine hesitancy among Republicans — many influenced by misinformation — has been a hot topic on cable news and social media for months, but the data are bearing out those concerns.

As of Monday, Vermont had at least partially vaccinated the highest percentage of its residents, at 61.9%, followed by Maine (60.6%) and Hawaii (58.8%), according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The six New England states ranked among the top seven nationwide.

The three states with the lowest vaccination rates were all in the Deep South — Mississippi (32%), Louisiana (33.5%) and Alabama (33.8%).

The national average is 46%.

The numbers are not surprising. A Monmouth University poll in March found that 36% of Republicans said they did not plan to get inoculated, compared to 6% of Democrats. An NPR-PBS Newshour-Marist survey around the same time found that 49% of Republican men said they would not get the shot, compared to 6% of Democratic men.

A study published last month by researchers at University of California San Diego’s Rady School of Management found that Republicans grew more skeptical of a potential COVID-19 vaccine — as well as other inoculation, including the flu shot. Republicans also consistently viewed the coronavirus to be less threatening than Democrats, the study said. The researchers said one potential reason for the disparities is that Republicans and Democrats reported consuming information from different sources.

“We now know that political affiliation is an important predictor of how communities respond to public health concerns,” the study’s authors wrote. “If we understand which areas and communities where vaccine hesitancy may be rising, it can help inform effective communication and health interventions.”

President Joe Biden has set a goal for 70% of American adults to receive at least one vaccine dose by July 4. Currently that number is at 58.5%.

Five states — Connecticut, Hawaii, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Vermont — already have surpassed the 70% threshold, while Maine was on the cusp Wednesday. Fifteen other states have already administered at least one dose to 60%-70% of its adults.

Biden held a virtual, bipartisan meeting with governors Tuesday to discuss ways to drum up vaccination rates.

The Biden administration, meanwhile, has announced a series of new initiatives to try to meet the 70% goal, including partnering with Uber and Lyft to provide free rides to and form vaccination sites, and having retail pharmacies and community colleges team up to vaccinate students, staff and nearby residents.

The White House also has changed how vaccine doses are allocated by redistributing more to states where demand is greater.

Federal officials also have been trying to enlist the help of people whom the vaccine hesitant, including Republicans, might be more likely to trust, including faith and community leaders, doctors, and celebrities.

“There's a lot of information that's flowing out there,” White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Tuesday. “And it's not all that misinformation is malintent, and we don't always see it that way. What our focus, though, is on … is empowering and engaging local voices... ensuring that accurate information is coming not just through paid channels or even earned media channels, but also through local, trusted voices. And that is what we have seen is the most effective in breaking through.”

May 15, 2021 10:31 AM  
Anonymous homosexuality never produces life, two of 'em ain't ever a marriage said...

"Vaccine hesitancy among Republicans — many influenced by misinformation — has been a hot topic on cable news and social media for months, but the data are bearing out those concerns."

everyone has a right to decline vaccines

odd how liberals embrace the right to kill the unborn because the government can't control your body but they would love to make vaccines mandatory

I'm not a big fan of Biden's CDC director but she got it perfectly right on Thursday:

"What we're really doing is empowering individuals to make decisions about their own health. If you are vaccinated and you're making the decision to take off your mask ... you are safe. If you are unvaccinated, then you've made the decision to take that risk."

Honestly, this should have been the policy from the beginning. Even before the vaccine, people who wanted to be safe could wear a mask and stay away from people. We should revise our policies and laws to make sure there is never a repeat of the horrendous violations of civil and constitutional right that occurred over the last 14 months.

As for hot topics, the media has been trying to stir up doubt about the CDC's quite clear statement Thursday. On Friday, the had a headline about how "confusing" it is. On Saturday, they had a front page story about how "abrupt" it was. By Sunday, they gave up and had an editorial grudgingly admitting the CDC was right.

Outside of Montgomery County, the pandemic in America is over.

It's time to celebrate

May 17, 2021 6:00 AM  
Anonymous fan of our current Supreme Court said...

"The difference now is that the only people who will get sick are those who wanted to. It's now a personal choice."

it always was

you were always free to stay home and get things delivered and wear a mask if you absolutely had to go out

there was never any need for the government to intervene

"Those of us who stayed home, social distanced, wore masks and managed to stay healthy, those of us who got vaccinated, don't have much to worry about."

so, what are you whining about now?

"There is a small chance that we will still get infected, and a tiny chance that the infection will be serious. There is an even smaller chance that a vaccinated person will infect someone else."

actually, that's true of any number of diseases

there are small chances you'll get them

it's called life

"So really, I hate to say it, but it's not our problem now. The pandemic is raging, and with unvaccinated people going into crowds without masks you can be sure we will see a spike in infections, but mostly they will only be people who were too dumb to follow the rules."

they are no rules

there are choices

the government's role is to inform us about risks

our role is to decide what risk we are willing to tolerate

"At this point nobody is telling you what to do, the virus needs hosts and you are free to volunteer to be one."

don't be so glum

you can always go back to trying to impose on everyone else in other ways

how about the climate change canard?

maybe you can force everyone to stop eating red meat and driving!!!!!!!!

maybe you can find no ways to force everyone to help you celebrate homosexual "marriages"!!!!!

May 17, 2021 6:20 AM  
Anonymous Happily married heterosexuals don't obsess over gay marriages said...

"odd how liberals embrace the right to kill the unborn because the government can't control your body but they would love to make vaccines mandatory"

Odd how conservatives go around screaming about killing unborn babies and "sanctity of life" and then are the last and least likely to go in and get live-saving vaccines - all the time decrying about "government control" and "destroying their freedoms."

It really makes it look like they really don't care about the "sanctity of life" at all - except when they can use it to shame people and promote their "conservative" agenda. When considered in context with their aversion to sex education and animosity towards LGBT people, it really shows they are just unnaturally obsessed with controlling other people's genitals.

It's going to be impossible for me to take their "killing babies" schtick seriously anymore considering how they have behaved during this pandemic.

The "conservative" ethos provides the perfect opportunity to combine their favorite topics of "sanctity of life" and "patriotism" with these vaccines by promoting it as the most patriotic exercise a civilian can perform by squashing this pandemic as quickly as possible - saving TENS OF THOUSANDS of American lives - and thwarting the development of even more dangerous strains that could be even worse. As a side effect, it would end the pandemic as quickly as possible and return our economy back to normal sooner rather than later.

But instead they've chosen to act like like spoiled brats and say "whaaahh! I don't wanna! Personal Freedom! Bllaahh Bllaaah blah! It's the democrats' fault!"

May 17, 2021 10:57 AM  
Anonymous Happily married heterosexuals don't obsess over gay marriages said...

"you were always free to stay home and get things delivered and wear a mask if you absolutely had to go out"

Simply not true for Americans at the bottom of the opportunity ladder. They had to keep working - if they were lucky enough to still have a job.

"there was never any need for the government to intervene"

The stupidity shown by the last President and his cult of believers proves otherwise. By definition, half of the population has a below-average IQ. He did not serve those people well. He couldn't even keep himself, his family, or people in the Rose Garden safe.

"our role is to decide what risk we are willing to tolerate"

At most, that is only half of it. Conservatives have the inability to acknowledge that the world doesn't revolve around them. There are other people in your city, state, and country. Learn what patriotism REALLY is and consider their health as well - and stop being so obsessed with yourself.

We are each a small part of a SOCIETY. Our SOCIETY doesn't work well when people ignore traffic lights, toxic waste laws, or public health guidelines. If you're proud to be an American, you should be proud to protect the lives of your fellow American citizens.

Otherwise, you're just a another selfish fool.

May 17, 2021 11:08 AM  
Anonymous Merrick Garland....LOL!!!!!!!!!!! said...

The Supreme Court on Monday said it would hear a case from Mississippi challenging Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that established a constitutional right to abortion. The case will give the court’s new 6-to-3 conservative majority its first opportunity to weigh in on state laws restricting abortion.

May 17, 2021 12:22 PM  
Anonymous PATT MORRISON said...

Lest We Forget the Era Preceding Roe vs. Wade

I could tell you, on this 30th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s Roe vs. Wade ruling, about the politics of abortion: how conservatives earn “pro-life” props by sticking it to poor women and young women with mean-spirited rules and bans; how President Bush appointed to a federal reproductive panel an anti-abortion doctor who wouldn’t prescribe birth control for unmarried women; how Senate Republicans may make it illegal for teenagers in states that limit abortion for minors to travel to get abortions in states that don’t. (Gee, why didn’t they try that on the underage spring-break party animals who used to drive from New England to Florida so they could drink legally till they puked?)

I could tell you about the violence, too, the torching of clinics, the harassing of patients -- a Los Angeles woman who had had abdominal surgery was pummeled by “pro-lifers” until her stitches tore -- and the intimidation, the killings of doctors, nurses and staff by zealots.

But I’m going to tell you about how it was before abortion was legal, and if the “pro-life” forces get their way, this is how it will be again.

Every big-city hospital had one -- a septic abortion ward, for women who had nearly killed themselves trying to abort a pregnancy.

Dr. Daniel Mishell is now professor and chairman of the ob-gyn department at the Keck School of Medicine at USC. In the years before Roe vs. Wade, he was a resident at Harbor General Hospital near Torrance and later at what is now County-USC hospital.

The women he treated “were the sickest patients, I’ll tell you that, because of what they did and the infections they got” -- appalling infections like gas gangrene, which killed tissue and sometimes the patient. “We had ladies who got so infected they went in shock and their kidneys shut down. A lot of them did die.”

At any one time, 15 or 20 women lay in the county hospital septic abortion ward, an additional half a dozen at Harbor. They were too sick to talk, but Mishell knew the common thread: usually unmarried and abandoned by the man, uniformly, suicidally desperate.

They jabbed into their uteruses with knitting needles and coat hangers, which Mishell sometimes found still inside them. They stuck in bicycle pump nozzles, sometimes sending a fatal burst of air to the heart. They’d try to insert chemicals -- drain cleaner, fertilizer, radiator-flush -- and miss the cervix, corrode an artery and bleed to death. Mishell once put a catheter into a woman’s bladder and “got a tablespoon of motor oil.”

“I’m telling you, it was really an awful situation. It touched me because I’d see young, [otherwise] healthy women in their 20s die from the consequences of an infected nonsterile abortion. Women would do anything to get rid of unwanted pregnancies. They’d risk their lives. It was a different world, I’ll tell you.”

(Why didn’t they just get birth control, you wonder. Because some state laws still defined contraception as “obscene,” and not until 1965 -- in living memory of some of you reading this -- did the Supreme Court say contraceptives were legal for married couples. The unmarried didn’t get that right until 1972.)

May 17, 2021 12:51 PM  
Anonymous PATT MORRISON said...

The women Mishell treated were poor working women. The rich had other means of breaking the laws against abortion, with doctors as discreet as they were expensive. Mishell spent 1961 working in Sweden, and remembers frequent calls from colleagues back home wanting to send their pregnant, prosperous patients over to get abortions.

It’s the American way, the “country club exemption.” If you have the money and connections, there’s always a way around the law, whether it’s taxes, the draft or abortion.

On a fine morning a while back, in a pleasant Southern California kitchen, I was talking with a woman who, 40 years ago, was known to the world as Sherry Finkbine.

She was host of a children’s TV show, had four kids and was pregnant with her fifth when she took pills her doctor-husband got from Europe. They turned out to contain thalidomide, a drug that creates nightmarish deformities in fetuses.

No American state, no American law permitted her to abort the deformed fetus, so she flew to Sweden, and for a time she was reviled from her hometown to the Vatican.

In her kitchen that morning, she told me, “I’m a real believer in freedom of choice. And if you think abortion is horrible, then for God’s sakes I would never try to talk you into it.” It is “the most intimate, personal, heartbreaking decision anyone has to make -- a human issue that doesn’t have any business in a political campaign.... I wish all those energies spewed out by those right-to-life people could be turned into time spent improving the quality of life for a battered child, the orphaned child, the hungry child, the unwanted child.”

Two things happened in her life on Jan. 22, 1973: Her step-granddaughter was born, and her youngest daughter wrote to congratulate her on the bittersweet news of the Roe ruling: “The Supreme Court finally decided to listen to you.” Her mother’s answer: “Fortunately for your generation and the generations to come, man will no longer sit in legal judgment of abortion.”

And yet here it is, 30 years later, and hers, the first generation of American women to live with the legal protection of Roe vs. Wade, may also turn out to be the last.

(This article was written in 2003. It is just as relevant today.)

May 17, 2021 12:54 PM  
Anonymous The Chinese Connection -- ants in a web said...

A sprawling online network tied to Chinese businessman Guo Wengui has become a potent platform for disinformation in the United States, attacking the safety of coronavirus vaccines, promoting false election-fraud claims and spreading baseless QAnon conspiracies, according to research published Monday by the network analysis company Graphika.

The report, provided in advance to The Washington Post, details a network that Graphika says amplifies the views of Guo, a Chinese real estate developer whose association with former Trump White House adviser Stephen K. Bannon became a focus of news coverage last year after Bannon was arrested aboard Guo’s yacht on federal fraud charges.

Graphika said the network includes media websites such as GTV, for which Guo last year publicly said he was raising funds, along with thousands of social media accounts that Graphika said amplify content in a coordinated fashion. The network also includes more than a dozen local-action groups over which Guo has publicly claimed an oversight role, Graphika found.

Graphika’s research sheds more light on Guo, a onetime billionaire real estate developer who, in addition to his relationship with Bannon, has drawn attention for the confusing mix of disinformation and invective he has broadcast since moving to the United States, including contradictory attacks on both the Chinese Communist Party and anti-CCP dissidents in the West.

The Graphika report “is an important forensic analysis of the ways that rich and politically motivated people can manipulate social media,” said Joan Donovan, director of the Technology and Social Change Research Project at Harvard’s Shorenstein Center.

Other analysts also have identified the network as boosting Guo-related media and aligned political messaging. Alethea Group, a firm that tracks disinformation and other online threats, said it had detected an effort in November to spread disinformation in Spanish.

May 17, 2021 1:14 PM  
Anonymous homosexuality is inherently sado-masochistic said...

"Odd how conservatives go around screaming about killing unborn babies and "sanctity of life" and then are the last and least likely to go in and get live-saving vaccines - all the time decrying about "government control" and "destroying their freedoms.""

an analogy that is completely non-analogous

if you choose an abortion, you are murdering an innocent and defenseless child

if you choose not to have a vaccine, you are only hurting yourself

it's a matter of risk assessment

some think vaccines are not worth the risk

that's their right

"It really makes it look like they really don't care about the "sanctity of life" at all - except when they can use it to shame people and promote their "conservative" agenda. When considered in context with their aversion to sex education and animosity towards LGBT people, it really shows they are just unnaturally obsessed with controlling other people's genitals."

actually, I'm a libertarian and believe LGBT people should be free to engage in whatever sick practices they want to - AMONG THEMSELVES

that doesn't mean the rest of us should teach children that these sick practices are normal

that doesn't mean the rest of us should have to institutionalize these sick relationships by giving them marital status

"It's going to be impossible for me to take their "killing babies" schtick seriously anymore considering how they have behaved during this pandemic."

gee, what a blow to the pro-life movement

I don't know if it will ever recover....

"The "conservative" ethos provides the perfect opportunity to combine their favorite topics of "sanctity of life" and "patriotism" with these vaccines by promoting it as the most patriotic exercise a civilian can perform by squashing this pandemic as quickly as possible - saving TENS OF THOUSANDS of American lives - and thwarting the development of even more dangerous strains that could be even worse. As a side effect, it would end the pandemic as quickly as possible"

conservatives developed a vaccine in record time, long before Joe Biden took office

that is saving lives and is available to anyone that wants it

"and return our economy back to normal sooner rather than later."

the economy is doing fine

if you're concerned, stop Biden frim enacting inflationary policies which will bring back the days of Jimmy Carter

"But instead they've chosen to act like like spoiled brats and say "whaaahh! I don't wanna! Personal Freedom! Bllaahh Bllaaah blah! It's the democrats' fault!""

it's always been possible to become safer by relinquishing freedom

you want real safety?

try North Korea

May 17, 2021 7:00 PM  
Anonymous homosexuality is inherently sado-masochistic said...

"Simply not true for Americans at the bottom of the opportunity ladder. They had to keep working - if they were lucky enough to still have a job."

workplaces all required masks

those at the bottom, under about 50, were never at significant risk of death

they were hurt much worse by the lockdowns

"The stupidity shown by the last President and his cult of believers proves otherwise. By definition, half of the population has a below-average IQ. He did not serve those people well. He couldn't even keep himself, his family, or people in the Rose Garden safe."

no one in his family or the Rose Garden died, nor did he

"At most, that is only half of it. Conservatives have the inability to acknowledge that the world doesn't revolve around them. There are other people in your city, state, and country. Learn what patriotism REALLY is and consider their health as well - and stop being so obsessed with yourself."

Trump enabled the development of vaccines that are now free to all

most liberals are in paper-pushing jobs they could easily do from home

There are other people in your city, state, and country. They have been seriously harmed by the Dems' inane lockdowns. Learn what patriotism REALLY is and consider their welfare as well - and stop being so obsessed with yourself.

"We are each a small part of a SOCIETY. Our SOCIETY doesn't work well when people ignore traffic lights, toxic waste laws, or public health guidelines. If you're proud to be an American, you should be proud to protect the lives of your fellow American citizens.

Otherwise, you're just a another selfish fool."

every American citizen now has the option to protect themselves with a free vaccine

it's an odd concept of altruism that you think they should be forced to accept your tolerance of risk for themselves

maybe you should think about what you're saying

I know you've been a jackass for a long time but it's never too late to try something new

May 17, 2021 7:10 PM  
Anonymous Happily married heterosexuals don't obsess over gay marriages said...

"if you choose not to have a vaccine, you are only hurting yourself"

That is unlikely, and it is obvious you haven't been paying attention. One of the big problems with this disease is that you can spread it before you even know you have it. Shortly after you become infected, and before you show signs of illness, you can - and likely will - spread it to other people unless you're in lockdown staying away from everyone else.

The fact of the matter is you don't know how many other people you infected before you started feeling ill. You are NOT just hurting yourself, but those you infected; and then there is a whole chain of infections after that. It's not just about YOU - it's about everyone else as well.

On top of that, every time a new person is infected, new variants arise - some of which may be even more contagious or lethal than the main ones circulating now. The one in India may be particularly bad.

"it's a matter of risk assessment"

Republicans can't even balance a budget. There is no evidence they can grasp the first concepts of statistics.

"workplaces all required masks

those at the bottom, under about 50, were never at significant risk of death"

Tell that to all those people who died at meat packing plants. At least one of the new variants appears to be more problematic for young people.

Death isn't the only thing folks worry about here. An unpredictable fraction of those who survive end up with long-term consequences. Many of those who recover can't afford spending a month in intensive care. In the US, that kind of care can ruin a family financially. A quick death would be cheaper for them, and easier on their family. You're not looking at the whole picture here.

"no one in his family or the Rose Garden died, nor did he"

Yes, Rump got hundreds of thousands of dollars of the latest and best experimental treatments that US taxpayers could pay for. Most people in the US aren't that lucky. And we have no idea how many people got sick or died from those who were infected in the Rose Garden.

On a related note:

President Donald Trump's campaign rallies were linked to 30,000 coronavirus cases and "likely led to more than 700 deaths," according to a new study by Stanford University:

https://sebotero.github.io/papers/COVIDrallies_10_30_2000.pdf

May 18, 2021 10:03 AM  
Anonymous Happily married heterosexuals don't obsess over gay marriages said...

"if you're concerned, stop Biden frim enacting inflationary policies which will bring back the days of Jimmy Carter"

It's too late for that. We still haven't paid for the tripling of the national debt under Ronnie Raygun. We're still paying for his "Star Wars" plan that never got off the ground. The supply-side pandering that this country has followed for the past 40 years has only made it worse. The only times the debt started to get under control was under Clinton, and under Obama during the "sequestration" years.

If we keep going like this, a debt crisis is inevitable. It's only a matter of time.

What you neglect to mention about Carter is WHY there was a huge inflation problem - and that was because Nixon took us off the gold standard. Arguably, he had to. Some bright finance guys in Britain did the math and realized the US couldn't possibly have enough gold reserves to cover all the war spending they had been doing in Viet Nam. So they planned to cash in their chips and get their gold out. Nixon found out and took us off the gold standard before they got here. At that point, the money printing became obvious and inflation was inevitable.

"it's an odd concept of altruism that you think they should be forced to accept your tolerance of risk for themselves"

That's because it doesn't have anything to do with altruism.

It's a concept that is quite foreign to Conservatives - it's called "responsibility."

As US citizens, we have a societal RESPONSIBILITY to make sure our behavior doesn't negatively impact our neighbors. Just because I can afford a month in intensive care, doesn't mean all the people I meet can. It's just part of being a decent person.

"I know you've been a jackass for a long time but it's never too late to try something new"

I spent years posting here being kind, gentle, and funny, under the presumption that the anti-LGBT crowd here was simply grossly misinformed, and once they had the opportunity to get some real first-hand facts and chat with LGBT people one-on-one, that they would realize that all of their fears and animosities were simply unjustified.

But year after year of hearing the same maligning, denigrating, and fear-mongering mis-characterizations your ilk post here of innocent LGBT people taught me that you weren't here to exchange intellectual ideas, or even argue in good faith.

Your only purpose here is to denigrate LGBT people as much as you possibly can by any means possible. And if that means conflating them with Nazis and pedophiles, why that is just perfectly acceptable.

That makes you, at best, a bully.

There is only one way bullies stop bullying people. And that is when the pain of bullying their victim outweighs the enjoyment they derive from bullying.

May 18, 2021 10:25 AM  
Anonymous I wonder if TTFers agree with any part of the Constitution.... said...

"That is unlikely, and it is obvious you haven't been paying attention. One of the big problems with this disease is that you can spread it before you even know you have it. Shortly after you become infected, and before you show signs of illness, you can - and likely will - spread it to other people unless you're in lockdown staying away from everyone else."

when I say "only hurting yourself," I should have said "or others who have chosen to take that risk"

"The fact of the matter is you don't know how many other people you infected before you started feeling ill. You are NOT just hurting yourself, but those you infected; and then there is a whole chain of infections after that. It's not just about YOU - it's about everyone else as well."

each and every person can protect themselves by wearing a mask and avoiding contact with anyone who is not wearing a mask

and, at this point, by getting a vaccine, which is freely available to all

the only justification for mask mandates, at this point, is to say your interest in someone's is more important than their own

that's pretty offensive

"On top of that, every time a new person is infected, new variants arise - some of which may be even more contagious or lethal than the main ones circulating now. The one in India may be particularly bad."

if we engage in anticipatory mitigation, this will never end

research released last week shows that Pfizer & Moderna are effective against all variants, including the one currently spreading in India

when a variant arises with a demonstrated ability to evade immunization, we'll deal with that

moving forward the plan is to tweak the vaccine annually, just like the flu shot

"Republicans can't even balance a budget."

the last time the Federal budget was balanced was when Newt Gingrich, a Republican, made a "contract with America" to restrain Bill Clinton

"There is no evidence they can grasp the first concepts of statistics."

red states did better than blue states during the pandemic so your statement rings hollow

ask people whose parents died in nursing homes in NY what they think of Dem risk assessment

"Tell that to all those people who died at meat packing plants."

that was early in the pandemic before safety measures were in place

I have no problem with workplace safety, just governmental intrusion

"Death isn't the only thing folks worry about here. An unpredictable fraction of those who survive end up with long-term consequences. Many of those who recover can't afford spending a month in intensive care. In the US, that kind of care can ruin a family financially. A quick death would be cheaper for them, and easier on their family. You're not looking at the whole picture here."

neither are you

the economic devastation on the working class is much more pervasive

again, people who have refused vaccination can protect themselves by using masks

they have no right to impose on others to keep them safe when they refuse to protect themselves and get vaccinated

"President Donald Trump's campaign rallies were linked to 30,000 coronavirus cases and "likely led to more than 700 deaths," according to a new study by Stanford University:

https://sebotero.github.io/papers/COVIDrallies_10_30_2000.pdf"

dubious, and probably based on unwarranted assumptions

the CDC recently concluded that outdoor transmission is extremely rare

the virus doesn't discriminate based on politics

if BLM and antifa protesters didn't get sick, why would Trump supporters outside?

May 18, 2021 1:05 PM  
Anonymous I wonder if TTFers agree with any part of the Constitution.... said...

"If we keep going like this, a debt crisis is inevitable. It's only a matter of time."

tell Biden that

"As US citizens, we have a societal RESPONSIBILITY to make sure our behavior doesn't negatively impact our neighbors. Just because I can afford a month in intensive care, doesn't mean all the people I meet can. It's just part of being a decent person."

actually, the only people you seem to want to take responsibility for is those who haven't chosen to get a vaccination

and their message to you is "back off!"

you have a Marxist aversion to personal responsibility for one's own welfare

you have no right to impose our personal risk assessment on others

May 18, 2021 1:12 PM  
Anonymous Oh look, the pot is calling the kettle black, again said...

"dubious, and probably based on unwarranted assumptions"

May 18, 2021 1:57 PM  
Anonymous It's the racism said...

Almost half of Republicans are now saying the quiet part out loud: They’d prefer to ditch this whole democracy thing.
So finds CBS News-YouGov polling conducted in mid-May. The survey asked Republicans a series of questions about the required level of fealty to former president Donald Trump, their views of the 2020 election and priorities for the party going forward.
The results were bleak.
Two-thirds said it was “important” for Republicans to be “loyal to Donald Trump now.” The same share said they did not believe President Biden was the legitimate winner of the 2020 election. (They apparently missed House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s (R-Calif.) recent assertion that “I don’t think anybody is questioning the legitimacy of the presidential election.”)
But the most troubling results came from a question about the party’s best strategy for winning in 2022 and 2024. If you were consulting for the party, respondents were asked, would you focus on developing a message and “popular policies and ideas” to win over more voters? Or would you prioritize changes to the voting rules in states and districts?
A whopping 47 percent chose the latter option. In other words, nearly half of those who still identify as Republicans appear to have given up on a key premise of democracy: that you earn the right to govern by proposing ideas that appeal to a majority of the public. They’d prefer to short-circuit that process and, instead, make it harder for their opponents to vote.
So much for “party of ideas,” as the GOP once called itself.
In truth, the Republican Party mostly stopped coming up with new ideas about three decades ago, when it declared Reaganomics gospel and rarely looked back. No matter what evidence has since become available, GOP officials insist that tax cuts pay for themselves and that less regulation is always better (well, except when it comes to immigrants or trade or personal enemies of a Republican president, perhaps). But the GOP at least still pretended to generate novel, popular ideas and therefore be the party better suited to governance. To this day, some Republican politicians claim that it’s really Trump’s policy ideas, incoherent though they may be, that energize the base — rather than, you know, the cult of personality. Or the racism.
But party leaders let slip last summer that they no longer stood for any fixed principles whatsoever except loyalty to Trump. This was made clear when the Republican National Committee announced that it would not adopt a platform for a presidential election for the first time since the party’s founding more than 160 years earlier.
Party officials have prized allegiance to Trump above all else — as exemplified by, among other things, the ouster of Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.) from her party leadership role. They have likewise abandoned any pretense of pursuing policies that voters want or that could otherwise improve their constituents’ lives; GOP political rhetoric is instead consumed by rants about fake burger restrictions or Mr. Potato Head. Meanwhile, their actual policymaking apparatus has been laser-focused on voter suppression. So far this year, legislators in at least 47 states have introduced bills that would restrict ballot access; at least 12 states have already made it harder to vote.

May 18, 2021 2:07 PM  
Anonymous Happily married heterosexuals don't obsess over gay marriages said...

"red states did better than blue states during the pandemic so your statement rings hollow"

Red states largely have lower population densities and large rural areas - making it intrinsically far easier to avoid infections than large cities where millions of working people rely on public transportation to get their job every day. A virus can't spread itself from on yahoo in a truck to another one on the same highway doing 60mph. Another person in the same subway car? That's another matter entirely.

"that was early in the pandemic before safety measures were in place"

So were New York's cases.

North and South Dakota are both red states that were NOT subjected to the virus early on, yet they are #1 and #3 for highest COVID cases per capita: https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/us/

South Dakota did folks no favors when it held the Sturgis motorcycle rally. Despite that being "outside," and number of COVID cases were attributed to it. So here's a link to another scientific study you will create an excuse to blithely dismiss: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6947e1.htm


"the only justification for mask mandates, at this point, is to say your interest in someone's is more important than their own

that's pretty offensive"

Since you can't imagine, or simply understand why it is still important wear masks you just make up some reason to blame me that offends you.

Your immunity to logic and facts is utterly astounding.

"the CDC recently concluded that outdoor transmission is extremely rare"

I'm pretty sure that's not exactly what the CDC said - but maybe I missed that announcement. Feel free to post a link here to back up your assertion.

Outdoor transmission is indeed less likely, possibly even making it into the "rare" category. That still means it is NOT 0. There are over 328 million people in the US. Even at a 0.1% transmission rate "outside", that amounts to 328 thousand people that could get the virus if we all went outside together.

"if BLM and antifa protesters didn't get sick, why would Trump supporters outside?"

Go back and look at the videos - the vast majority of BLM protesters made a habit of wearing masks and moving (marching) outside. Rump supporters made a point of NOT wearing masks (because, "freedumb!") and sitting next to each other on bleachers yelling their heads off.

"actually, the only people you seem to want to take responsibility for is those who haven't chosen to get a vaccination"

That's not what I said, implied or meant at all. Try reading my post again, more slowly this time, and look up the big words in a dictionary.

"and their message to you is "back off!"
you have a Marxist aversion to personal responsibility for one's own welfare
you have no right to impose our personal risk assessment on others"

You entirely missed the point of what I said about personal responsibility, and I have no conceivable way to impose my "personal risk assessment" on others - I have no major media or political platform other than what you read here. And the conservatives here make a point of trying to undermine EVERYTHING I type.

Just because I can come up with a more compelling argument for wearing masks and getting vaccinated than you can for NOT doing those things, doesn't mean I have any kind of Marxist tendencies. It just shows how desperate you are to throw out ad hominem attacks when you can't make a cogent point.

May 18, 2021 2:07 PM  
Anonymous "I love the poorly educated" - DJT - said...

Jacob Chansley, dubbed the QAnon Shaman in the media, is among the most famous of the Capitol rioters who is facing federal criminal charges in connection with the January 6 insurrection. Albert Watkins, Chansley's attorney, discussed his client with Talking Points Memo's Matt Shuham — who reports that Watkins indicated that he is using his client's mental state as a defense.

Watkins told Shuham, "A lot of these defendants — and I'm going to use this colloquial term, perhaps disrespectfully — but they're all fucking short-bus people. These are people with brain damage, they're fucking retarded, they're on the goddamn spectrum. But they're our brothers, our sisters, our neighbors, our coworkers — they're part of our country. These aren't bad people; they don't have prior criminal history. Fuck, they were subjected to four-plus years of goddamn propaganda, the likes of which the world has not seen since fucking Hitler."

The propaganda that Watkins is obviously referring to is the propaganda of former President Donald Trump. The rioters who attacked the Capitol on January 6 bought into Trump's false and totally debunked claim that the 2020 election was stolen from him. And Watkins is arguing that they were manipulated by the former president.

Watkins wrote that Chansley has been consistent "in his assertion that but for the actions and the words of the President, he would not have appeared in Washington, DC to support the President and, but for the specific words of the then-President during his January 6, 2021 speech, the Defendant would not have walked down Pennsylvania Avenue and would not have gone into the U.S. Capitol Building."

May 19, 2021 2:31 PM  
Anonymous MnM better never need Capitol Police protection! said...

Neither Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) nor House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (Calif.) will support the independent commission created by a bill that is expected to pass the House.

Sponsored by House Homeland Security Committee Chair Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.) and ranking member John Katko (R-N.Y.), the bill was modeled after the bipartisan commission formed after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

“We members of the United States Capitol Police write this letter to express our profound disappointment with the recent comments from both chambers’ minority leaders expressing no need for a January 6th commission,” the letter read.

It continued, “The brave men and women of the USCP were subjected to hours and hours of physical trauma which has led to months of mental anguish. If you look around the Capitol building, you still have doors that are broken, windows still smashed and in some cases missing. Officers are forced to go to work with the daily reminder of what happened that dreadful day.”

https://twitter.com/Olivia_Beavers/status/1395125137943498756

May 19, 2021 6:03 PM  
Anonymous homosexual marriage is an inherently sado-masochistic arrangement that should be discouraged by any civilized society said...

"Red states largely have lower population densities and large rural areas - making it intrinsically far easier to avoid infections than large cities where millions of working people rely on public transportation to get their job every day."

Houston, San Antonio, Dallas, Austin, Jacksonville, Fort Worth, Columbus, Charlotte, Indianapolis, El Paso, Nashville, Oklahoma City

all are in the top 25 cities in America, ranked by population

all rationally red

"A virus can't spread itself from on yahoo in a truck to another one on the same highway doing 60mph. Another person in the same subway car? That's another matter entirely."

you're pretty ignorant, aren't you?

yes, in addition to spreading disease in nursing homes, Cuomo kept subways operating 2 months into the pandemic in Spring 2020, when half of all COVID cases in America were in the NYC metropolitan area

meanwhile, in Florida, DeSantis protected nursing homes and the liberal media howled about beaches being open, which we now know is among the safest places

it's not population density

it's that red state leaders followed the science

and blue states were fixated on spreading misery in an attempt to discredit Trump

even now, you are here arguing that there is some reason for vaccinated people to wear masks when the CDC says it has evaluated the studies and concluded it is unnecessary for vaccinated people to wear mask

then, you claim you haven't seen the studies

let me bring you up-to-date:

in the last month, studies have shown there is little possibility of contracting the virus outdoors or by touching physical surfaces, and vaccinated people do not spread the disease to others, there is no need for vaccinated people to wear face coverings or physically distance, capacity limits are unnecessary

"South Dakota did folks no favors when it held the Sturgis motorcycle rally. Despite that being "outside," and number of COVID cases were attributed to it."

the people who caught it in Sturgis were not outside, they jammed bars all night long

why do you persist in making ignorant statements?

"Since you can't imagine, or simply understand why it is still important wear masks you just make up some reason to blame me that offends you.

Your immunity to logic and facts is utterly astounding."

you aren't arguing with me, now

you are arguing with Joe Biden's CDC

they said masks are unnecessary for the vaccinated

they said the science shows that

May 20, 2021 6:08 AM  
Anonymous homosexual marriage is an inherently sado-masochistic arrangement that should be discouraged by any civilized society said...


"Outdoor transmission is indeed less likely, possibly even making it into the "rare" category. That still means it is NOT 0. There are over 328 million people in the US. Even at a 0.1% transmission rate "outside", that amounts to 328 thousand people that could get the virus if we all went outside together."

one of the many ignorant aspects of the blue states is to elevate the significance of COVID risks above all other risks

the statement you make above is true of many risks we have always routinely taken

life will always have its risks

"Go back and look at the videos - the vast majority of BLM protesters made a habit of wearing masks and moving (marching) outside."

I went to a few BLM protests

your remark here is false

"That's not what I said, implied or meant at all. Try reading my post again, more slowly this time, and look up the big words in a dictionary."

in the event you use a "big word", I'll look it up

you're having enough trouble with the little ones

the only people at risk are those who have chosen to not be vaccinated

the rest of us don't deserve to bear the burden of protecting them from the consequences of their own decision

and we have no right to make the decision for them

"Just because I can come up with a more compelling argument for wearing masks and getting vaccinated than you can for NOT doing those things, doesn't mean I have any kind of Marxist tendencies. It just shows how desperate you are to throw out ad hominem attacks when you can't make a cogent point."

I didn't argue against getting vaccinated and my view on masks correlates with the CDC

your idea that personal health decisions should be controlled by government is common in Marxist societies

if someone chooses not to get vaxxed, they may need a mask to stay safe

whether to take that risk is up to them

and if they don't wear it, they only endanger others who have made the same choice

as for you:

if you go carrying pictures of Chairman Mao

you ain't gonna make it up with anyone anyhow

May 20, 2021 6:08 AM  
Anonymous Republican governors plan to cut off a $300-a-week federal unemployment benefit and they say, "Let them eat cake" said...

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment aid fell last week to 444,000, a new pandemic low and a sign that the job market keeps strengthening as consumers spend freely again, viral infections drop and business restrictions ease.

Thursday’s report from the Labor Department showed that applications declined 34,000 from a revised 478,000 a week earlier. The number of weekly jobless claims — a rough measure of the pace of layoffs — has declined steadily since the year began.

The data release coincides with rapid moves by nearly all the nation’s Republican governors to cut off a $300-a-week federal unemployment benefit that they and many business executives blame for discouraging the unemployed from seeking jobs. Those cutoffs of federal jobless aid will begin in June.

Twenty-two states, from Texas and Georgia to Ohio and Iowa, have acted to block the federal government’s $300 weekly payment for the unemployed, according to an Associated Press analysis. Two more states, Florida and Kansas, are considering doing so. Those 24 states all have Republican governors and state legislatures.

Unemployed Americans have been able to receive the federal benefit, which was included in President Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion financial rescue package, on top of their state jobless aid.

Combined, the cutoff of federal jobless aid in the states that are targeting it would reduce unemployment benefits for 3.5 million people, according to Oxford Economics.

May 20, 2021 9:27 AM  
Anonymous Happily married heterosexuals don't obsess over gay marriages said...

"it's not population density
it's that red state leaders followed the science"

"Houston, San Antonio, Dallas, Austin, Jacksonville, Fort Worth, Columbus, Charlotte, Indianapolis, El Paso, Nashville, Oklahoma City
all are in the top 25 cities in America, ranked by population"

You have confused size with density, moron. Some of those cities don't even have a subway system.

Houston's Metrorail serves a total annual ridership of 18.335 million.
Dallas' Dart system does 16.261 million per year.
New York's was doing 5.6 million rides per *DAY*.
Nashville and Oklahoma city don't even have subway systems.

You're comparing big apples and raisins and claiming the raisins did so much better, when they never had to deal with that scale of a problem to begin with.

New York had to develop whole new strategies and equipment to clean the system: https://ny.curbed.com/2020/5/5/21246343/nyc-subway-overnight-shutdown-coronavirus

While President Rump had been telling folks "It’s going to go away, hopefully at the end of the month. And, if not, hopefully it will be soon after that." Mar 31, 2020

"then, you claim you haven't seen the studies"

No, I said this: "I'm pretty sure that's not exactly what the CDC said - but maybe I missed that announcement. Feel free to post a link here to back up your assertion."

And I was referring specifically to this statement:

"the CDC recently concluded that outdoor transmission is extremely rare"

You still have not shown us when / where they said that, and I know how fast and loose you are with mangling the meaning of other people's words. So it would be nice to see if that ACTUALLY said that or not.

'Cause I seem to recall them saying things like "much less likely." Like this Mayo Clinic advice:

"The COVID-19 virus is primarily spread from person to person among those in close contact, within about 6 feet (2 meters). The virus spreads through respiratory droplets released into the air when talking, coughing, speaking, breathing or sneezing. In some situations, especially in enclosed spaces with poor ventilation, the COVID-19 virus can spread when a person is exposed to small droplets or aerosols that stay in the air for minutes to hours.

When you're outside, fresh air is constantly moving, dispersing these droplets. So you're less likely to breathe in enough of the respiratory droplets containing the virus that causes COVID-19 to become infected if you haven’t had a COVID-19 vaccine."

Or how about from the CDC itself: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/deciding-to-go-out.html

"Can you keep 6 feet of space between you and others? Will you be outdoors or indoors?
The closer you are to other people who may be infected, the greater your risk of getting sick.

Keeping distance from other people is especially important for people who are at higher risk for severe illness, such as older adults and those with underlying medical conditions.
Indoor spaces are more risky than outdoor spaces where it might be harder to keep people apart and there’s less ventilation."

Activities are safer if:

You can maintain at least 6 feet of space between you and others. COVID-19 spreads easier between people who are within 6 feet of each other.

They are held in outdoor spaces. Indoor spaces with less ventilation where it might be harder to keep people apart are more risky.

People are wearing masks. Interacting without wearing masks also increases your risk."

So as I asked before, where does the CDC say "extremely rare" when referring to outdoor transmission?

May 20, 2021 10:31 AM  
Anonymous To the troll liar said...

"Go back and look at the videos - the vast majority of BLM protesters made a habit of wearing masks and moving (marching) outside."

I went to a few BLM protests

your remark here is false


I have attended BLM protests every Friday since June 5, 2020 along the Corridor of Churches and every attendee wears a mask.

Your remark is the false one.

May 20, 2021 10:37 AM  
Anonymous Happily married heterosexuals don't obsess over gay marriages said...

"your idea that personal health decisions should be controlled by government is common in Marxist societies"

There you go again mangling what I actually wrote.

Since you can't seem to find a dictionary, or other source to help you figure things out, here is a useful tidbit on "personal responsibility" that I have referred repeatedly in my posts, but you somehow misconstrue to "government controls" and "Marxism." It's from Wikipedia:

"Personal responsibility or Individual Responsibility is the idea that human beings choose, instigate, or otherwise cause their own actions. A corollary idea is that because we cause our actions, we can be held morally accountable or legally liable.

Personal responsibility can be contrasted to the idea that human actions are caused by conditions beyond the agent's control. Since the late 19th-century, personal responsibility has become increasingly associated with political conservatism and libertarianism. More recently, personal responsibility has been associated with the reform of social welfare programs (e.g. in the Persona 1996). The earliest known English use of the phrase is by Massachusetts Rep. Nathaniel Gorham at the U.S. Constitutional Convention on July 18, 1787."

As someone who repeatedly tries to tell us he's a "libertarian" (Bwahhahaaha!) you should at least familiarize yourself with some libertarian concepts.

The "do whatever I want and don't give a damn about anyone else" attitude you espouse is much closer to Ayn Rand's near nihilism:

"The question isn't who is going to let me; it's who is going to stop me."

'To say 'I love you' one must first be able to say the 'I.'

"I swear, by my life and my love of it, that I will never live for the sake of another man, nor ask another man to live for mine."

May 20, 2021 10:46 AM  
Anonymous Dem monopoly control of inner cities has led to poverty and racism said...

"The "do whatever I want and don't give a damn about anyone else" attitude you espouse"

actually, I've never "espoused" that attitude here

right now, according the CDC's review of scientific data, vaccinated people are in no danger and pose no danger to others

unvaccinated people only pose a danger to those who choose to take the risk of not being vaccinated and not wearing a mask

there is no role for the mask mandates you want

Marx is an enemy of mankind

May 20, 2021 4:08 PM  
Anonymous Happily married heterosexuals don't obsess over gay marriages said...

"there is no role for the mask mandates you want"

Why do you think that compulsively lying about what I wrote will get you anywhere?

I never once advocated for a mask mandate, much less said I wanted one. The only time it even made it in my post was when I copied it from your comments.

Is it even POSSIBLE for you to have a conversation without lying about what other people wrote or making up nefarious things about their motivations?

"Marx is an enemy of mankind"

You keep throwing around "Marxism" and "Marx" when no one here advocated for him or his philosophies. Like most Republicans, "Marxism," "Socialism," and "Communism" have become swear words that trigger conservatives and get spewed about liberally on liberals for everything Conservatives disagree with. Those words have all but lost their meaning because a liberal can't even say "I enjoy blue skies" without some Conservative screaming "take your communist green tree-hugging propaganda to Russia!"

So hers is some useful information for you:

What Is Marxism?

Marxism is a social, political, and economic philosophy named after Karl Marx. It examines the effect of capitalism on labor, productivity, and economic development and argues for a worker revolution to overturn capitalism in favor of communism.

Marxism posits that the struggle between social classes—specifically between the bourgeoisie, or capitalists, and the proletariat, or workers—defines economic relations in a capitalist economy and will inevitably lead to revolutionary communism.


KEY TAKEAWAYS
Marxism is a social, political, and economic theory originated by Karl Marx, which focuses on the struggle between capitalists and the working class.

Marx wrote that the power relationships between capitalists and workers were inherently exploitative and would inevitably create class conflict.

He believed that this conflict would ultimately lead to a revolution in which the working class would overthrow the capitalist class and seize control of the economy.

[Gee, the closest thing we had to that recently was a bunch of angry, red-hatted beardy guys trying to overthrow our capitalist democracy back on January 6th.]

May 20, 2021 6:05 PM  
Anonymous Happily married heterosexuals don't obsess over gay marriages said...

More info on Marxism, for those who keep using that word but don't really know what it means:

The following are elements of Marx's theories on how class conflict would play out in a capitalist system.

Capitalist society is made up of two classes—the bourgeoisie, or business owners, who control the means of production, and the proletariat, or workers, whose labor transforms raw commodities into valuable economic goods.

Ordinary laborers, who do not own the means of production, such as factories, buildings, and materials, have little power in the capitalist economic system. Workers are also readily replaceable in periods of high unemployment, further devaluing their perceived worth.

To maximize profits, business owners have an incentive to get the most work out of their laborers while paying them the lowest possible wages. This creates an unfair imbalance between owners and the laborers whose work they exploit for their own gain.

Because workers have little personal stake in the process of production, Marx believed they would become alienated from it (as well as from their own humanity) and resentful toward the business owner.

The bourgeoisie also employ social institutions, including government, media, academia, organized religion,2 and banking and financial systems, as tools and weapons against the proletariat with the goal of maintaining their position of power and privilege.

Ultimately, the inherent inequalities and exploitative economic relations between these two classes will lead to a revolution in which the working class rebels against the bourgeoisie, seizes control of the means of production, and abolishes capitalism.

May 20, 2021 6:07 PM  
Anonymous remember Brett Kavanaugh? he was the final nail in the gay agenda's coffin said...

Marxists are using global warming alarmism to promote governmental control of economic activity:

https://www.realclearenergy.org/articles/2021/05/20/unsettled_what_climate_science_tells_us_what_it_doesnt_and_why_it_matters_by_steven_e_koonin_778065.html

May 23, 2021 7:56 AM  
Anonymous Thanks Joe! said...

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is plunging into the next phase of his administration with the steady approval of a majority of Americans, according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. The survey shows Biden is buoyed in particular by the public’s broad backing for his handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

In the fourth month of his presidency, Biden’s overall approval rating sits at 63%. When it comes to the new Democratic president’s handling of the pandemic, 71% of Americans approve, including 47% of Republicans.

The AP-NORC poll also shows an uptick in Americans’ overall optimism about the state of the country. Fifty-four percent say the country is on the right track, higher than at any point in AP-NORC polls conducted since 2017; 44% think the nation is on the wrong track.

Those positive marks have fueled the Biden White House’s confidence coming out of the president’s first 100 days in office, a stretch in which he secured passage of a sweeping $1.9 trillion pandemic relief package and surged COVID-19 vaccines across the country. The U.S., which has suffered the most virus deaths of any nation, is now viewed enviably by much of the rest of the world for its speedy vaccination program and robust supplies of the shots.

“We are turning a corner,” said Jeff Zients, the White House’s COVID-19 response coordinator.

The improvements have also impacted Americans’ concerns about the virus. The AP-NORC poll shows the public’s worries about the pandemic are at their lowest level since February 2020, when the virus was first reaching the U.S. About half of Americans say they are at least somewhat worried that they or a relative could be infected with the virus, down from about 7 in 10 just a month earlier.

As has been the case throughout the pandemic, there is a wide partisan gap in Americans’ views of pandemic risks. Among Democrats, 69% say they remain at least somewhat worried about being infected with the virus, compared with just 33% of Republicans.

The number of workers seeking and receiving unemployment benefits through state and federal programs has reached pandemic lows ahead of this summer, when 22 Republican states plan to end a $300 federal benefit early.

Initial unemployment claims through regular state programs dropped to 444,000 last week, marking a new low level since the pandemic hit in mid-March 2020.

The number of people claiming benefits through state and pandemic-related programs also declined in the week ended May 1 to a pandemic low of 16 million people from 16.9 million a week earlier, the Labor Department said on Thursday. That includes benefits through one of several programs, including regular state aid and federal emergency programs put in place in response to the pandemic.

U.S. stocks rose Thursday after release of the jobless claims data showed layoffs further easing in the labor market, and major indexes snapped a three-day losing streak.

May 23, 2021 11:28 AM  
Anonymous you know what makes me laugh? TTF said...

Biden's handling of the vaccine rollout has been horrible

even, swaths of minorities, especially Hispanics, want the vaccine and haven't been able to get it

give him credit for backing up the CDC statement against heavy lunatic pressure last week

btw, the virus leaked out of a lab in Wuhan

the pandemic was exacerbated by Chinese deception and pressure in the WHO

the owe us trillions in reparations

how will Biden collect?:

https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/politifact-retracts-wuhan-lab-theory-fact-check

May 23, 2021 12:23 PM  
Anonymous Florida needs to step up its game said...

Like José Alfredo, many Hispanics want to get vaccinated, but are running into barriers while doing so. Some of the limitations, which affect all Hispanics regardless of their race and socioeconomic status, include the inability to miss a work day to get vaccinated, lack of legal documentation, not being able to speak English or Spanish (some only speak indigenous languages from Latin America), mistrust in the healthcare industry and misinformation about the COVID-19 vaccine. They also find it difficult to keep up with the frequent changes to vaccination requirements and vaccination center locations.

Erick Sánchez, an organizer for WeCount!, an organization for immigrant workers in South Florida, visits different parts of Miami-Dade County each morning, offering help to farmers and day laborers.

The activist said he estimates that between 70% and 80% of all Hispanics with whom he interacts ultimately decide they want the vaccine, after he explains what it is and how it works. But then other issues come up.

As the demand for their work has plummeted due to the pandemic, some have lost their place to live or had trouble paying their bills or buying food. They can’t afford to miss a day of work to explore the possibility of receiving a much-needed dose.

Others don’t have government-issued IDs, licenses or other ways to prove state residency, such as utility bills. Although they pay rent in a Florida home, they do so in large groups of up to 10 at a time, Sánchez said, and that means not everyone has an electricity or water bill in their name.

Zackery Good, the assistant to the city manager of Homestead, told the Herald that Miami-Dade County vaccination sites accept farmworker IDs, often issued by organizations like WeCount!, as proof of residency. The county mayor’s office confirmed that information to the Herald, but it has not yet been widely shared.

The state’s requirements for vaccination, which have caused confusion by changing frequently and often providing conflicting information, are yet another reason Hispanics who want to get vaccinated, haven’t been able to do it.

On a recent morning in early April, Gabriel Alcala, a 36-year-old illustrator, drove 45 minutes from his home in South Dade, near Zoo Miami, to a vaccination center in North Miami Beach in hopes of receiving his first dose, as the state had recently expanded eligibility.

But he was rejected. The site had changed from a vaccination center that could also give first doses, to one that distributed only second doses, just a few days earlier. Alcala had to wait while his father — who had received the first dose in the same site three weeks earlier — received his second shot.

“I’ll find it somewhere,” Alcala said. “I’m still young, I work from home. But I would like to get it.”

Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration have announced that COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective, at least one of the FIU study participants cited concerns about the side effects during an interview with the Herald.

Although the FIU team did not compile official data on the reasons people said they would not get vaccinated, Cano said the main reason he heard as an interviewer was that they had heard negative information about the vaccine.

“There are many myths, like that they use cells from fetuses or that women are going to be sterile if they get the vaccine, or even that it has a chip [a conspiracy theory falsely preaches that people are being injected with an implant microchip to control humans through the vaccine],” said Cano, who doubles as an FIU professor and director of the doctoral program in epidemiology..

May 23, 2021 1:24 PM  
Anonymous You know what makes me laugh? Conservatives with 0 self-awareness said...

"how will Biden collect?"

That's easy - he'll just send Trump after them, get them to pay for the virus just like Trump got Mexico to pay for the Wall!

Bwahahahhahahahhaha!

May 23, 2021 1:26 PM  
Anonymous BIDEN IS HOW OLD?!?!?!?!?! said...

"many Hispanics want to get vaccinated, but are running into barriers while doing so. Some of the limitations, which affect all Hispanics regardless of their race and socioeconomic status, include the inability to miss a work day to get vaccinated, lack of legal documentation, not being able to speak English or Spanish (some only speak indigenous languages from Latin America), mistrust in the healthcare industry and misinformation about the COVID-19 vaccine. They also find it difficult to keep up with the frequent changes to vaccination requirements and vaccination center locations"

well, what's Biden doing about it?

thought you said he doing a bang-up job rolling out the vaccines...

say, you weren't lying, were you?

May 23, 2021 7:54 PM  
Anonymous the "smart" Dem Party has been running the nation's largest cities for decades and has done nothing about racist police brutality said...

The University of Notre Dame's 2021 commencement is set for Sunday, but President Biden will reportedly be absent from the event.

Breaking with recent tradition, the president will not address the ceremony after 4,300 "members of the Notre Dame community" signed a petition urging Notre Dame President Fr. John Jenkins not to invite Biden, the second Roman Catholic president, over his stance on abortion.

Biden during the week delivered a commencement address at the Coast Guard Academy and spoke virtually at the commencement for Syracuse University, his law school alma mater.

Either the president or vice president usually attends the Notre Dame commencement their first year in office. President George W. Bush gave the commencement address in 2001, President Barack Obama gave the address in 2009 and Vice President Mike Pence spoke at the ceremony in 2017.

The petition said that Biden should neither speak at commencement nor be given an honorary degree, and said that signers were "dismayed by the pro-abortion and anti-religious liberty agenda of President Joe Biden."

"He rejects Church teachings on abortion, marriage, sex and gender and is hostile to religious liberty. He embraces the most pro-abortion and anti-religious liberty public policy program in history. The case against honoring him is immeasurably stronger than it was against honoring President Obama," it continued.

The petition argued Biden had a goal of "providing direct federal funding to abortions." It was signed by students, alumni, and other members of the community.

May 23, 2021 8:07 PM  
Anonymous Merrick Garland, Goresuch & Kavanaugh....LOL!!!!!! said...

I was the fastest girl in Connecticut. But transgender athletes made it an unfair fight.
When I was forced to race male bodies on the track, colleges didn’t see the fastest female in Connecticut. They saw a second- or third-place runner.

It’s February 2020. I’m crouched at the starting line of the high school girls’ 55-meter indoor race. This should be one of the best days of my life. I’m running in the state championship, and I’m ranked the fastest high school female in the 55-meter dash in the state. I should be feeling confident. I should know that I have a strong shot at winning.

Instead, all I can think about is how all my training, everything I’ve done to maximize my performance, might not be enough, simply because there’s a runner on the line with an enormous physical advantage: a male body.

I won that race, and I'm grateful. But time after time, I have lost. I’ve lost four women’s state championship titles, two all-New England awards, and numerous other spots on the podium to male runners. I was bumped to third place in the 55-meter dash in 2019, behind two male runners. With every loss, it gets harder and harder to try again.

That’s a devastating experience. It tells me that I’m not good enough; that my body isn’t good enough; and that no matter how hard I work, I am unlikely to succeed, because I’m a woman.

Don't eliminate women's sports

That experience is why three of my fellow female athletes and I filed a lawsuit last year with Alliance Defending Freedom against the Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference (CIAC): because girls and women shouldn’t be stripped of their right to fair competition.

The CIAC allows biological males to compete in girls’ and women’s sports. As a result, two males began racing in girls’ track in 2017. In the 2017, 2018, and 2019 seasons alone, these males took 15 women’s state track championship titles (titles held in 2016 by nine different girls) and more than 85 opportunities to participate in higher level competitions that belonged to female track athletes.

That’s because males have massive physical advantages. Their bodies are simply bigger and stronger on average than female bodies. It’s obvious to every single girl on the track.

But Connecticut officials are determined to ignore the obvious. And unfortunately, a federal district court recently dismissed our case. The court’s decision to do so tells women and girls that their feelings and opportunities don’t matter, and that they can’t expect anyone to stand up for their dignity and their rights.

Don't ignore the obvious: Transgender athletes deserve compassion, but not the right to transform women's sports

That’s wrong. And it chips away at women’s confidence and our belief in our own abilities.

It’s happened to me over and over. Every time I walk up to the starting line, I try to tell myself that I can overcome the unfair odds — I can win, even though the race is stacked against me

May 23, 2021 8:13 PM  
Anonymous in Michigan, only the governor is allowed to be a hypocritical human said...

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer issued an apology on Sunday after an image showed her to be apparently violating state-mandated social distancing guidelines at an East Lansing restaurant.

A photo circulated on social media of Whitmer with a large group of unmasked people at the Landshark Bar & Grill.

The photo, which showed Whitmer seated with about a dozen people at no fewer than three tables that had been pushed together, was posted on social media by one of the attendees, but later deleted, according to the Detroit Free Press.

Michigan restaurants and bars remain subject to capacity limits and social distancing requirements due to the coronavirus outbreak. Current orders require six people or less at tables and distances of 6 feet between tables.

"Throughout the pandemic, I've been committed to following public health protocols," Whitmer said on Sunday in a statement cited by multiple media outlets, including the Detroit News.

"Yesterday, I went with friends to a local restaurant. As more people arrived, the tables were pushed together. Because we were all vaccinated, we didn't stop to think about it," the governor said.

"In retrospect, I should have thought about it. I am human. I made a mistake, and I apologize," her statement added.

May 24, 2021 7:14 AM  
Anonymous Republicans prefer being told lies rather than the truth - Kinzinger gunning to be the next Liz Cheney said...

Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.) on Sunday tore into House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) for “not telling the truth” about their party’s role in the deadly insurrectionist attack on the U.S. Capitol in January.

During an appearance on “Fox News Sunday,” Kinzinger told host Chris Wallace that forming a commission to investigate the Jan. 6 attack — like the commission formed after 9/11 — is critical and that efforts to block its creation by McCarthy and other GOP leaders are reprehensible.

“What we need is a comprehensive look of what happened that led up to Jan. 6,” Kinzinger said. “Who was talking to who? What were the lies?”

“The American people deserve the truth,” he continued, “and my party to this point has said things like it was hugs and kisses, it was antifa and [Black Lives Matter], it was anything but what it was, which was a Trump-inspired insurrection on the Capitol.”

McCarthy initially blamed then-President Donald Trump for the Capitol attack, linking Trump’s divisive rhetoric and lies about the election to the violence at the country’s seat of government. McCarthy allegedly shouted at Trump over the phone as the president’s supporters were storming the Capitol on Jan. 6, telling Trump to call off the attack.

But less than a month later, Trump appeared to be in McCarthy’s good graces again: McCarthy met with Trump at Mar-a-Lago on Jan. 29 to discuss how the GOP can win back the House in 2022.

The House voted Wednesday to establish the commission to investigate the attack, with 35 Republicans, including Kinzinger, joining Democrats to support the panel’s creation in spite of opposition from McCarthy and other top GOP members.

The bipartisan vote sets up a showdown with the Senate, where Republicans led by Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) may filibuster the bill because the investigation could be politically damaging for the Republican Party.

“I do think Kevin has failed to tell the truth to the Republicans and to the American people,” Kinzinger said Sunday. “And it pains me to say it. It’s not like I enjoy standing up and saying this.”

He added that the 74 million people who voted for Trump in the 2020 election, and specifically the ones who believe the election was stolen, have been misled by some of their representatives.

“The people they trust have either been silent or not told them the truth,” Kinzinger said. “That’s where Kevin has failed, because he told the truth ... then he went to Mar-a-Lago and said Donald Trump’s the leader of the party. He’s right ― Donald Trump is the leader of the party. But we need to tell people the truth.”

May 24, 2021 10:06 AM  
Anonymous It looks like they found some voter fraud - and misogyny said...

DENVER — A Colorado man suspected in the death of his wife who disappeared on Mother’s Day 2020 is also accused of submitting a fraudulent vote on her behalf for Donald Trump in November’s presidential election, newly released court documents show.

Barry Morphew told investigators he mailed the ballot on behalf of his wife, Suzanne Morphew, to help Trump win, saying “all these other guys are cheating,” and that he thought his wife would have voted for Trump anyway, according to an arrest warrant affidavit signed Thursday by a judge in Chaffee County.

Morphew, 53, faces possible first-degree murder and other charges in connection with the disappearance of Suzanne Morphew on May 10, 2020. He was arrested May 5 and is currently being held in connection with that case.

Morphew posted a widely viewed video on Facebook pleading for her safe return shortly after she disappeared.

Authorities say the arrest was the result of an ongoing investigation that has so far failed to find Suzanne Morphew’s body.

After conducting over 135 searches across Colorado and interviewing 400 people in multiple states, investigators believe Suzanne Morphew is dead but have not found her body, Chaffee County Sheriff John Spezze has said.

May 24, 2021 2:36 PM  
Anonymous homosexuality never produces life, two of 'em ain't ever a marriage said...

"So really, I hate to say it, but it's not our problem now. The pandemic is raging, and with unvaccinated people going into crowds without masks you can be sure we will see a spike in infections,"

was in a restaurant in DC this weekend, people packed in like sardines, not a mask in sight...

we're 10 days out from TTF's "sure we will see," still waiting for that spike

cases are down 33% in now-maskless DC:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/national/coronavirus-us-cases-deaths/?itid=hp_pandemic%20test

turns out Trump Derangement Syndrome is not a guide to all truth, after all

May 25, 2021 6:43 AM  
Anonymous homosexuality never produces life, two of 'em ain't ever a marriage said...

"cases are down 33% in now-maskless DC:"

actually, it's 55%

sorry, kids!

May 25, 2021 6:47 AM  
Anonymous fan of our current Supreme Court said...

here's some tips on how TTFers can cope with their inability to accept the judgement of science that it is safe to end COVID restrictions:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-to-handle-your-re-entry-anxiety-as-the-pandemic-recedes-11621094399?mod=djm_eng_100day_FB&fbclid=IwAR1YAS_5DuYBwjAiOokYVY8IJ1SzT_XDCDkMLFxlcohfsHEg9p4l2AYaJrs

May 25, 2021 7:08 AM  
Anonymous Trump Never Received Majority Job Approval Rating During His Entire Presidency, 41 Separate Polls Show said...

"Rasmussen Reports
@Rasmussen_Poll

Most Voters Support #Commission to #Investigate #CapitolRiot... https://bit.ly/2RCJECw #BreakingPol

"Rasmussen Reports Daily Presidential Tracking Poll

Tuesday, May 25, 2021

The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Tuesday shows that 54% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Biden’s job performance. Forty-three percent (44%) disapprove."

May 25, 2021 12:51 PM  
Anonymous for millennia, society has known that two genders are necessary to make a marriage said...

"The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Tuesday shows that 54% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Biden’s job performance. Forty-three percent (44%) disapprove."

it's actually disingenuous to compare Trump and Biden

Trump's style was to be abrasive and win the long game

it was working

were it not for the biological attack by China, he'd still be President

the best way to judge Biden is by comparing him to other Presidents who tried to be popular

comparing him to Clinton, George HW, Obama, George W reveals how dismal Biden's presidency is

they had much higher approval at this point in their presidencies

he got the stimulus package through but things don't look to promising for anything else

the Dems are cracking into divisions

May 25, 2021 4:42 PM  
Anonymous Dem monopoly control of inner cities has led to poverty and racism said...

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden’s infrastructure plan is hitting roadblocks. A policing overhaul after the killing of George Floyd is up in the air. Even a seemingly bipartisan effort to investigate the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol faces the blockade of Republican opposition in Congress.

It’s a pivotal time for many aspects of Biden’s ambitious agenda. Rounding the first quarter of his presidency, the White House and Congress have been unable to meet key Memorial Day deadlines set by the administration on crucial priorities.

While lawmakers quickly approved Biden’s $1.9 trillion COVID-19 rescue package and senators confirmed the top ranks of the administration with Biden’s nominees, the next legislative priorities on the White House’s agenda will be a longer slog.

The sweeping infrastructure investment, in particular, faces a crucial moment: The White House is assessing whether the president can strike a bipartisan deal with Republicans on his American Jobs Plan, a top domestic priority, or try to go it alone with Democrats if no progress is made over the next week. Biden’s allies in the House and Senate are preparing for all scenarios

May 25, 2021 5:41 PM  
Anonymous gender has consequences said...

A rise in violent crime is endangering slim Democratic congressional majorities more than a year out from the midterm elections and threatening to revive “law and order” as a major campaign issue for Republicans for the first time since the 1990s.

Homicides in cities increased by up to 40% over the previous year, the biggest single-year increase since 1960, a trend that has not abated so far in 2021. Sixty-three of the 66 largest police jurisdictions saw a rise in at least one category of violent crime, ranging from homicide and rape to robbery and assault, according to the Major Cities Chiefs Association. Homicides and shootings have gone up in Washington, D.C., and at least a dozen mass shootings were reported nationwide over the weekend.

Democrats’ flirtations with defunding the police — a handful of them nearly scuttled a $1.9 billion Capitol security bill in the House — may make them ill-equipped to handle the reemergence of crime as a top issue for voters. A reduction in the violent crime rate that began in the 1990s led to this concern receding at the ballot box, likely to the net benefit of Democratic candidates.

Former President Donald Trump ran hard against violence in major cities last year and frequently invoked the phrase “law and order.” Despite his loss to President Joe Biden and the preference of some Republican operatives for an emphasis on public safety rather than well-worn anti-crime catchphrases Trump tended to use, his hard-line stance still drew votes.

A top Democratic data scientist estimated that rising anxiety about crime and perceptions that Democrats did not support law enforcement drove more conservative-leaning nonwhite voters, especially Hispanics, to cast their ballots for Trump. In the end, Trump won voters whose top issue was crime and safety by 44 points, while Biden carried those who listed racial inequality by 85 points.

“Rising crime is a problem that must be addressed through both economic policies that are incentives to work while also giving law enforcement the support they need to enforce our laws,” said GOP strategist Jon Gilmore. “Republicans were successful in the 2020 cycle by addressing this important issue, and they would be wise to continue that drumbeat in the midterms.”

May 25, 2021 5:47 PM  
Anonymous government is not the solution to our problems, government is the problem said...

Biden and the Democrats now enjoy unified control of the elected branches of the federal government, giving them sole ownership of the crime issue.

The initial wave of outrage over Floyd was bipartisan, as officials across the ideological spectrum spoke out against the image of an officer kneeling on an unarmed black man’s neck. But as some of the protests turned violent, and liberals began to advocate shifting law enforcement resources into social services, things began to break down along traditional party lines.

May 25, 2021 7:16 PM  
Anonymous government is not the solution to our problems, government is the problem said...


A rise in violent crime during the 1960s, and growing public sentiment that the liberal wing of the Democratic Party was too soft in confronting it, helped fuel Republican victories in the 1970s and 1980s. This culminated in the 1988 presidential election, in which Democratic nominee Michael Dukakis saw a 17-point national lead evaporate due in part to the “Willie Horton” ad about Massachusetts’s furlough program for convicted violent criminals. Dukakis ended up losing 40 states.

Liberals are fearful of a repeat. Left-wing commentator Ezra Klein acknowledged the crime wave “is a crisis on its own terms” but also described it on Twitter as “a crisis for the liberal project.”

“I feel that crime surges relate back to cities that have a visible narrative of defund the police,” said GOP strategist Noelle Nikpour. “Republicans will definitely use this violence in advertising and even in fundraising to generate attention and to also see how upset voters are about the issue.”

The return of the crime issue could also affect the level of bipartisanship on future criminal justice and police reform measures. Trump signed one such initiative, the First Step Act, into law, and Sen. Tim Scott, a South Carolina Republican, saw another he led blocked by Senate Democrats.

May 25, 2021 7:17 PM  
Anonymous joe biden went to see jimmy carter for advice on the economy! said...

Summers, a Democrat who served as treasury secretary under President Bill Clinton and director of the National Economic Council under President Barack Obama, warned in an op-ed that while slow growth, unemployment, and deflationary pressures posed the most imminent risks to the economy during the pandemic, that paradigm has shifted.

“Our economy has outperformed those of other industrial countries. U.S. policymakers can take satisfaction from that,” he said in the Washington Post. “But new conditions require new approaches. Now, the primary risk to the U.S. economy is overheating — and inflation.”

Summers said the inflationary concerns come from increased demand from the more than $2.5 trillion in savings accumulated by consumers during the pandemic, the trillions of dollars in fiscal stimulus pumped out by the federal government, and large-scale Federal Reserve debt purchases. He also pointed out that the Fed has said it doesn’t intend to raise interest rates from their near-zero levels anytime soon.

“This is not just conjecture,” Summers said. “The consumer price index rose at a 7.5 percent annual rate in the first quarter, and inflation expectations jumped at the fastest rate since inflation indexed bonds were introduced a generation ago. Already, consumer prices have risen almost as much as the Fed predicted for the whole year.”

May 25, 2021 7:34 PM  
Anonymous You probably want to keep Republicans away from your kids said...

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — A high school student reported that a Kansas House member working as a substitute teacher manhandled him and kicked him in the testicles during class, and the lawmaker told authorities that God told him to do it, according to a sheriff’s deputy’s written statement.

The deputy’s affidavit, released to reporters Tuesday, said the boy showed him a golf ball-sized “road rash” and a 3-to-4 inch scratch on his back that he said appeared after Republican state Rep. Mark Samsel, of Wellsville, pushed him up against a classroom wall on April 28.

Samsel, 36, was charged last week with three misdemeanor counts of battery following his “rude, insulting or angry” interactions with two students, ages 15 or 16, during an art class at Wellsville High School. He has pleaded not guilty. Each of the charges is punishable by up to six months in jail.

The boy told the deputy that after Samsel pushed him against the wall and kicked him, “his back and testicles were in pain” for approximately 15 minutes, the affidavit said.

The Wellsville school district has banned Samsel from its property and events for a year.

There’s no indication that Samsel might face disciplinary action from the House, which can censure or expel a member, and its top Republican leaders have said the courts “must be allowed to work.”

On Monday, Scott asked the magistrate not to release the affidavit, but the judge released a redacted version.

The sheriff’s deputy said in the document that he asked the lawmaker why he had put his hands on the boy, and Samsel pointed to the ceiling. When the deputy asked Samsel whether God told him to do so, Samsel answered, “Twice.”

“He stated he knew it was wrong and he shouldn’t do it, he stated he did not want to do it,” the affidavit said. “He stated, ‘The whole world is telling me not to do it, God said, Yes.’ Mark believes this was God’s plan.”

Samsel told the deputy that he didn’t “want to do any of the things I did right there” and suggested he might end up in a psychiatric hospital “because it has all the appearance of a psychotic episode or manic episode,” the affidavit said.

Videos shot by students and provided by a parent show Samsel talking about suicide, God and sex in a noisy classroom.

The deputy said a female student told him Samsel at one point grabbed her by her shoulders, though he was “not aggressive.” She said he asked her: “Do you have mental problems?”

A Franklin County magistrate ordered Samsel to undergo a mental health evaluation. His next court hearing is set for July 12.

May 25, 2021 11:18 PM  
Anonymous Grand QAnon Party said...

New polling from PRRI, which is not a political polling outfit (they poll religious attitudes) will make your skin crawl. The cult is a real cult:

Nearly a quarter of Republicans say they believe that the US government, media, and financial sector are controlled by a group of Satan-worshipping pedophiles who run a global child sex trafficking operation, according to new polling from the non-partisan Public Religion Research Institute.

This belief is a core tenet of the far-right QAnon conspiracy theory, which continues to dominate far-right thinking months after former President Donald Trump left office. An even larger share of Republicans — 28% — believe in two other tenets of QAnon: that a coming “storm” will oust powerful elites and restore the country’s rightful leaders, and that “patriots” may have to use violence to save the US.

Overall, between 15 and 20% of Americans say they completely or mostly agree with the three tenets of QAnon. The polling found that a host of factors, including political orientation, news consumption, religious beliefs, and socioeconomic and demographic profile, correlate with belief in the conspiracy theory. Republicans are significantly more likely than Independents and Democrats to believe in QAnon.

Right-wing news consumption is the strongest predictor of belief in QAnon. Those who say they trust far-right media the most are nearly nine times more likely to believe in QAnon than those who most trust broadcast networks including ABC, CBS, and NBC.

Certain groups of Christians are also much more likely to believe in QAnon. Hispanic Catholics and Hispanic Protestants are almost three times as likely as non-religious Americans to believe in the conspiracy theory. White Catholics, evangelical Protestants, and mainline Protestants are about twice as likely as to subscribe to QAnon.

About a quarter of white evangelical Protestants believe in all three tenets of QAnon, while 24% of Hispanic Protestants believe in the Satan-worshiping cabal, 29% believe in the coming storm, and 12% believe Americans might have to resort to violence.

Just over 20% of white evangelical Protestants, Hispanic Protestants, and Mormons believe in QAnon. Jewish Americans and Americans who don’t associate with a religion are the least likely to believe in QAnon.

QAnon believers are also much more likely than other Americans to believe in various other conspiracy theories. Nearly three-quarters of QAnon believers also believe that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from Trump.

Overall, 29% of Americans believe Trump’s lie that the election was stolen.


I guess I’m not super surprised that a lot of fundamentalist religious types might buy into conspiracy theories. They are accustomed to not interrogating their beliefs. And there are a lot of these people in our polity. And they are the deluded tails wagging the GOP dog these days.

It’s what this 28% believes that freaks me out:

” a coming “storm” will oust powerful elites and restore the country’s rightful leaders, and that ‘patriots’ may have to use violence to save the US.”

That number represents tens of millions of gun-toting Trump cult extremists.

May 27, 2021 8:21 PM  
Anonymous TTF, teaching tomfoolery! said...

you'd think that if the number of Americans who believe Q-Anon theories were this high, I might have encountered at least one of them

I've never met anyone who does

makes me wonder how legit this poll is

"I guess I’m not super surprised that a lot of fundamentalist religious types might buy into conspiracy theories. They are accustomed to not interrogating their beliefs."

don't know how "fundamentalist religious types" are defined

evangelicals, however, are the most open-minded and questioning group in our society

your statement is rich, moreover, coming from someone who believes things like:

-we need to keep wearing masks after we're vaccinated, even though the science says no

-you can get COVID from touching things, even though the science says no

-you can get COVID from passing someone on the street, even though the science says no

-global warming has adversely affected the weather even though scientific data indicates that isn't so (read the current bestseller, "Unsettled"

-a human isn't a life until it is born

-Donald Trump colluded with Russia to win the 2016 election, even though Robert Mueller says no American did

-public schools are the best way to educate kids

-you can spend 6 trillion new dollars and not raise taxes on 98% of us and not increase the deficit

-universal mail-in voting, without a check of IDs, will not result in voter fraud

-black people can't vote if they have to show an ID in person to do so

-Anthony Fauci is a great scientist

-Andrew Cuomo is a great leader

-menthol cigarettes are racist

May 28, 2021 6:26 AM  
Anonymous Republicans believe things like: Corporations that don't peddle their propaganda should suffer "2nd Amendment" solutions said...

Rep. Matt Gaetz, the Florida Republican under federal investigation for alleged sex trafficking, suggested Thursday that followers should use their Second Amendment rights against social media companies that silence conservatives.

“The internet’s hall monitors out in Silicon Valley, they think they can suppress us, discourage us,” he said at a rally in Dalton, Georgia, co-hosted by Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Ga.). “Well you know what? Silicon Valley can’t cancel this movement, or this rally, or this congressman. We have a Second Amendment in this country, and I think we have an obligation to use it.”

Gaetz, a Donald Trump disciple and leading mouthpiece for Trump’s stolen election lie ahead of the Jan. 6 insurrection, made the comment one day after a gunman killed nine people in San Jose, in the heart of California’s Silicon Valley. That shooting continues a recent spate of mass shootings across the country.

Gaetz was speaking as part of an “America First” tour with Greene that’s been characterized as a Trump rally without Trump. Trump was banned from most mainstream social media platforms earlier this year after his rhetoric inspired the Capitol riot.

Cycling through the usual far-right talking points, the two have fixated on false claims about the 2020 presidential election and railed against Big Tech, antifa, the media and RINOs, or “Republicans in Name Only.”

May 28, 2021 11:23 AM  
Anonymous Many Republicans prefer the lies said...

Peter Wehner warns of more U.S. Capitol riot-style political violence should the GOP continue regurgitating ex-President Donald Trump’s 2020 election lies.

Wehner wrote in The Atlantic this week that “political violence will become more acceptable and more prevalent on the American right” if the Republican Party “doesn’t counteract these lies rather than indulge them.”

The GOP remains “fully in Trump’s thrall, with its leadership more committed than ever to spreading his foundational lies and conspiracy theories,” said Wehner, who served in the administrations of Presidents Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush and was a fervent critic of Trump throughout his one term in office.

Some elected Republicans “who initially reacted with horror” to the deadly U.S. Capitol riot that was incited by Trump were “now making their peace with it,” he wrote. And that’s “where things really get dangerous.”

“The repetition of the lies not only causes tens of millions of Americans to embrace them; over time, it deforms their moral sensibility,” wrote Wehner. “It creates an inversion of ethics, what in philosophy is known as the ‘transvaluation of values,’ in which lies become truth and unjust acts are seen as righteous.”

“Believing the deceptions also becomes a form of virtue signaling, a validation of one’s loyalty to others in one’s political tribe,” he concluded. “In this case, of course, what we’re dealing with is not just any lie; it’s a particularly destructive one, among the most dangerous a democracy can face. It erodes confidence in our elections, the rule of law, and our system of government.”

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/05/road-political-violence/618929/

At the beginning of last week, former President Donald Trump referred to the 2020 election as the “greatest Election Fraud in the history of our Country.” By the end of the week, he had issued a statement saying, “As our Country is being destroyed, both inside and out, the Presidential Election of 2020 will go down as THE CRIME OF THE CENTURY!”

What else is new? These are the ravings of a 74-year-old sociopath, isolated and banned from social media, living in Mar-a-Lago, where he is crashing wedding parties and delivering rambling monologues.

Or at least, that would be the right way to look at things, if not for the fact that the GOP remains fully in Trump’s thrall, with its leadership more committed than ever to spreading his foundational lies and conspiracy theories. Under Trump’s sway, the Republican Party is becoming more fanatical, venturing even further into a world of illusion...

May 28, 2021 12:30 PM  
Anonymous TTF, teaching tomfoolery! said...

"Republicans believe things like: Corporations that don't peddle their propaganda should suffer "2nd Amendment" solutions"

amazing!

I just posted the other day a series of things Dems believe without any basis

above is another

back in January, tens of thousands protested in front of the Capitol

a few hundred broke into the Capitol

and Dems claim that represents all Republicans

btw, a handful of social media outlets control much of the information in the country in a way the MSM used to

so, when they ban people, they are effectively censoring them

Florida has now passed civil penalties on social media companies that violate people's constitutional rights

look for more states to follow

May 29, 2021 8:29 AM  
Anonymous Happily married heterosexuals don't obsess over gay marriages said...

"I just posted the other day a series of things Dems believe without any basis"

No, what you posted were a bunch of over-simplifications and ridiculous extrapolations of what items some people on the left have said.

Anyone can do that - you avoid discussing actual issues in any depth by distorting what people have said, extrapolating things to ridiculous extremes and then imply that since the ridiculous extreme you posited is ridiculous, so was the original premise.

If you're going to do that for the left, there's no reason I shouldn't do that for the right as well.

May 29, 2021 10:44 AM  
Anonymous Jennifer Rubin - Conservative columnist said...

Republicans have made a political decision to back Donald Trump despite the insurrection he incited — and conservative Washington Post columnist Jennifer Rubin says it's not working.

"Republicans have adopted a three-pronged strategy to oppose President Biden and his agenda: Distraction (Oh, look, Dr. Seuss!), demonization (Socialism!) and denial (White House staff is really in charge, not Biden!). Republicans, as Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) let on, are '100 percent' invested in stopping Biden, whether it is his American Rescue Plan, his negotiated end to the 11-day Israeli-Hamas conflict (too fast, or maybe too slow!), his sanctions against Russia (not enough!), his selection of qualified women of color for top Justice Department jobs, the Jan. 6 commission, voting reform, forcing corporations to pay more taxes, or his infrastructure plan (even after Biden reduced it to $1.7 trillion). It does not seem to matter how popular an initiative is; whatever it is, Republicans are against it," Rubin wrote.

"Meanwhile, Republicans have moved from the 'big lie' that the election was stolen to a big voter-suppression crusade to big and farcical recounts," she noted. "So how is all that working out for Republicans? Not all that well. In the most recent Quinnipiac poll, for example, Democrats lead Republicans in the 2022 generic congressional poll by a healthy 9 points. In the most recent Morning Consult-Politico poll, Republicans in Congress have a net favorability rating of -19 (35 percent favorable vs. 54 percent unfavorable); Democrats have a +2 net favorability (47 percent favorable vs. 45 percent unfavorable). Meanwhile, FiveThirtyEight's poll average gives Biden a +14 net approval."

And the GOP's voter suppression schemes may backfire.

"Republicans choose to seek solace in voter suppression schemes, which will not necessarily benefit them. (As the Associated Press reported, these legislative gambits might deter rural and elderly voters, part of the GOP's base, from voting while they enrage and mobilize the Democratic base,)" she explained.

The GOP's decisions are making it harder for them to win elections.

"Most of all, elected Republicans, like their supporters, increasingly reside in a right-wing media bubble, which helps confirm their beliefs that the country is outraged by a socialist agenda and in a frenzy about cultural and racial memes. Living in a right-wing world of make-believe might be emotionally gratifying, but it does not prepare the party to win elections in the real world," Rubin noted. "Republicans' rhetoric might be odious, their assault on democracy irresponsible and their political thinking delusional. But Republicans' approach might also be entirely counterproductive. So far, the poll data shows they are doing a bang-up job of alienating everyone but MAGA cultists. That's no way to win elections."

May 29, 2021 10:48 AM  
Anonymous HAPPY mEMORIAL DAY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! said...

some things TTFers believe:

-we need to keep wearing masks after we're vaccinated, even though the science says no

-you can get COVID from touching things, even though the science says no

-you can get COVID from passing someone on the street, even though the science says no

-global warming has adversely affected the weather even though scientific data indicates that isn't so (read the current bestseller, "Unsettled"

-a human isn't a life until it is born

-Donald Trump colluded with Russia to win the 2016 election, even though Robert Mueller says no American did

-public schools are the best way to educate kids

-you can spend 6 trillion new dollars and not raise taxes on 98% of us and not increase the deficit

-universal mail-in voting, without a check of IDs, will not result in voter fraud

-black people can't vote if they have to show an ID in person to do so

-Anthony Fauci is a great scientist

-Andrew Cuomo is a great leader

-menthol cigarettes are racist

May 31, 2021 12:30 PM  
Anonymous Why don't Republicans believe in the Constitution any more? said...

Avowed QAnon disciple and confessed felon retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn has called for a Myanmar-like military coup in America.

“It should happen,” Donald Trump’s former national security adviser said in an astonishing declaration at a QAnon conference Sunday.

Myanmar’s military violently seized control of the country from its civilian government in late January, detained democratically elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi and top party members, and killed more than 700 protesters as of early this month. The military justified its action by claiming unproven “election fraud.”

Flynn presented his dark vision of a military coup and dictatorship in the U.S. in response to a question from the audience at the conference.

“I wanna know why what happened in Myanmar can’t happen here?” an unidentified member of the audience asked Flynn, though he pronounced the nation as “Minnimar.” The crowd erupted in cheers.

“No reason,” Flynn responded to wild screams of approval. “It should happen.”

It’s not the first time Flynn has called for a military takeover of a democratically elected government. He retweeted a message in December after Trump lost the election that called on the president to declare martial law and keep the White House by force.

It’s been a wild ride this week for Flynn, the star speaker at the four-day, ironically named “For God & Country Patriot Roundup” QAnon conference at the Omni Dallas Hotel.

Conspiracy theorist attorney Sydney Powell, who’s being sued for $1.3 billion for lies about Dominion voting machines, was another featured speaker.

Earlier in the conference, Flynn insisted that he’s “not a conspiracy theorist,” but then declared: “Trump won! He won! He won the popular vote, and he won the Electoral College vote.” (He didn’t.)

Flynn resigned after just 22 days as Trump’s national security adviser following reports that he had lied about his contact with a Russian official. He pleaded guilty in 2017 to lying to the FBI about his secret dealings with Russian ambassador to the U.S. and suspected spy Sergey Kislyak during the presidential transition, a felony. He then battled to withdraw his plea.

Trump pardoned Flynn in November after he lost the election.

Trump granted him an extremely broad reprieve from “any and all possible offenses” he might have committed linked to special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Kremlin interference in the 2016 election.

U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan angrily dismissed the case against Flynn following the pardon.

“A pardon does not necessarily render ‘innocent’ a defendant of any alleged violation of the law,” Sullivan noted in a 43-page memorandum. “Indeed, the Supreme Court has recognized that the acceptance of a pardon implies a ‘confession’ of guilt.” He called the pardon a “political” decision, not a legal one.

Flynn retains his military title and is collecting a full military pension even as he promotes a military coup against the democratically elected and constitutionally protected government.

May 31, 2021 12:48 PM  
Anonymous GOPers love insurrectionists said...

"back in January, tens of thousands protested in front of the Capitol

a few hundred broke into the Capitol

and Dems claim that represents all Republicans"

Given the paltry number of elected Republicans who care to investigate that insurrection, it's a valid claim.

This elected GOPer think beating and killing cops and looking for Mike Pence so they could hang him at the capitol on Jan 6 was a normal tourist visit:

Rep. Andrew S. Clyde (R-Ga.) last week downplayed the Jan. 6 assault on the Capitol, comparing the mob’s breaching of the building to a “normal tourist visit.”

June 01, 2021 2:13 PM  
Anonymous A RINO hopes Democrats can save the republic from Republicans said...

Conservative columnist Max Boot envisioned a “nightmare scenario” as he warned of a GOP plot to steal future elections in his latest column for The Washington Post.

“Republicans have spent nearly seven months making bogus charges of fraud in the 2020 election under the banner of ‘stop the steal,’” Boot wrote Tuesday. “Now they have segued into a ‘start the steal’ offensive to ensure that they will win the 2022 and 2024 elections — even if most voters once again support the Democratic Party.

The pundit broke down how GOP-sponsored laws to restrict voting in Georgia and Arizona — plus plans for the same in Texas — sought “to avert another election defeat for Republicans” and may help the GOP overturn Democratic victories.

Boot feared “a Republican-controlled Congress overturning the 2024 presidential election results to install (ex-president Donald) Trump or a Trump mini-me in the White House.”

“I hope I am being overly alarmist. I really do,” Boot wrote. “But after the storming of the Capitol — and the Republican failure to hold the instigators to account — we have crossed a Rubicon.”

“The best way to protect our electoral system is to pass the For the People Act, which would curb partisan gerrymandering and protect voting rights” he concluded. “Senate Democrats have to choose between saving the filibuster and saving democracy. They can’t do both.”

June 02, 2021 8:04 AM  
Anonymous True Blue in NM said...

Democrats held on to a suburban House seat in New Mexico on Tuesday, with state Rep. Melanie Stansbury (D) easily winning the Albuquerque-area district filled until this spring by Deb Haaland before she became President Biden’s interior secretary.

Stansbury defeated state Sen. Mark Moores, who worked to make the race a referendum on Albuquerque’s rising crime rate. Republicans, hopeful that suburban voters might abandon Democrats over their embrace of police reform, were stymied by a Stansbury campaign that emphasized her own support for law enforcement funding.

Stansbury’s victory, projected by the Associated Press little more than one hour after polls closed, will give Democrats 220 seats in the House to 211 for Republicans, offering a bit more breathing room to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) ahead of an expected summer push on infrastructure spending. Two Republicans will face each other in the runoff for another vacant House seat, in Texas, on July 27. Two open seats in Ohio, split between the parties, will not be filled until November, and a safely Democratic seat in Florida will remain vacant until January 2022.

With nearly 80 percent of the vote counted, Stansbury led by more than 28 points.

June 02, 2021 9:27 AM  
Anonymous #KarmaIsReal said...

When another boat began circling their vessel in a lake on Memorial Day, a group from Washington assumed they were trying to signal support for their gay pride flags.

But then someone on the other boat flipped a middle finger and yelled something about “gays” and “flags,” a passenger on the boat said. So the group started recording in case the situation escalated.

It did — but not how they might have expected.

Moments later, the other boat burst into flames, forcing its passengers to jump into the lake — and leaving the victims to become rescuers as they filmed a moment that turned into a viral video this week.

“These people harassed my family because we were flying gay pride flags … by racing around us and shouting gay slurs,” tweeted a passenger named Robbie along with a video that has been viewed more than 620,000 times on Twitter as of early Wednesday. “Then, their boat literally blew up! #KarmaIsReal.”

June 02, 2021 9:41 AM  
Anonymous homosexual "marriage" is sado-masochistic said...

"Trump pardoned Flynn in November after he lost the election."

in America, we don't put people in jail because we don't like their views

Flynn's prosecution was political and motivated by the craven Robert Mueller as a way to dig up dirt on Trump by threatening Flynn with a prosecution that even the FBI agents involved thought was improper

we need to reform our legal system to eliminate such tactics

"U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan angrily dismissed the case"

Sullivan is a narcissistic jackass

"Given the paltry number of elected Republicans who care to investigate that insurrection, it's a valid claim."

several parties, including the FBI, are actively investigating the events of Jan 6

Dems want to prolong the whole thing to give them and opportunity to give speeches in the Senate and distract from the Dems' grim prospects in Nov 2022

"“Republicans have spent nearly seven months making bogus charges of fraud in the 2020 election under the banner of ‘stop the steal,’” "

the problem is that there is no way to tell whether there was fraud because the rules were changed, supposedly by the pandemic, so there is no way to verify voters

"The pundit broke down how GOP-sponsored laws to restrict voting in Georgia and Arizona — plus plans for the same in Texas — sought “to avert another election defeat for Republicans” and may help the GOP overturn Democratic victories."

dirty little secret: all the rules you claim are restrictive are much more so in many blue states

compare them to Delaware and NY, for example

“The best way to protect our electoral system is to pass the For the People Act"

it's unconstitutional

"When another boat began circling their vessel in a lake on Memorial Day, a group from Washington assumed they were trying to signal support for their gay pride flags.

But then someone on the other boat flipped a middle finger and yelled something about “gays” and “flags,” a passenger on the boat said."

wow, what a great story

thanks for sharing

June 02, 2021 1:18 PM  
Anonymous Major General (ret.) Paul Eaton said...

One of the most important things we learn in leadership is to be clear in command. Michael Flynn is a retired military officer who knows this.

And yet during a recent right-wing rally attended by QAnon leaders, Flynn called for a Myanmar-style coup — in which the military overthrew a democratically elected government — here in America.

What Flynn did is sedition. And to be absolutely clear – it’s a treason that our men and women in uniform would never ever countenance.

I’m calling for Michael Flynn to be recalled to active duty and court martialed for his treason.

Flynn violated the oath we all took when we enlisted -- to support and defend the Constitution. That oath doesn’t retire when you do.

June 02, 2021 3:03 PM  
Anonymous Happily married heterosexuals don't obsess over gay marriages said...

"the problem is that there is no way to tell whether there was fraud because the rules were changed, supposedly by the pandemic, so there is no way to verify voters"

Actually there are plenty of ways - like this:

https://www.military.com/daily-news/2020/11/10/gop-list-of-alleged-voter-fraud-nevada-contains-hundreds-of-military-addresses.html

A letter sent Nov. 5 on behalf of President Donald Trump's reelection campaign to Attorney General William Barr alleges that 3,062 voters who do not live in the state of Nevada "improperly cast" absentee ballots in the 2020 election.

But the list that accompanies the letter of those accused of "criminal voter fraud" contains hundreds of overseas military post office boxes and more than 1,000 locations where military personnel are stationed, such as Minot, North Dakota; Edwards and Fort Irwin, California; Hill Air Force Base, Utah; Carlisle, Pennsylvania; and Yuma, Arizona.

To at least one military spouse whose residences of Henderson, Nevada, and Davis, California, are listed -- with their specific nine-digit ZIP codes (exact addresses are not included) -- finding herself and her husband, an Air Force major, on the list was "shocking."

"To see my integrity challenged, along with other members of the military to be challenged in this way, it is a shock. And to be potentially disenfranchised because of these actions, that's not OK," said Amy Rose, who votes absentee and claims Henderson as her home while the couple is stationed in California.

Rose found her locations on the list after a copy of the letter, sent by Weir Law Group on behalf of the Trump campaign, as well as the list, were published on Twitter by Riley Snyder, a reporter with the Nevada Independent.

The list contains two people who lived in Henderson, Nevada, and now live in Davis, California, in the 95618 zip code, with the 6104 addition -- the code that indicates a specific delivery route belonging to the couple.

"We put two and two together and realized, 'Yeah, Wow.' It's shocking to see ourselves there," Rose said.

The list contains at least 130 Army Post Office (APO) addresses, nine Fleet Post Office (FPO) addresses and 16 Diplomatic Post Office (DPO) addresses. It also contains hundreds of addresses from coast to coast, as well as Alaska and Hawaii, in cities known to have large military populations.

By law, military voters may vote absentee in their home of record or choose to register to vote in the state in which they reside. In the 2016 presidential election, 3,047 uniformed service members voted in Nevada, according to the Election Administration and Voting Survey.

June 02, 2021 4:29 PM  
Anonymous Happily married heterosexuals don't obsess over gay marriages said...

And a couple more voter fraud cases:

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/may/14/colorado-suspect-wife-death-accused-trump-vote

A Colorado man suspected in the death of his wife, who disappeared on Mother’s Day last year, is also accused of submitting a fraudulent vote on her behalf for Donald Trump in November’s presidential election, court documents show.

Barry Morphew told investigators he mailed the ballot on behalf of his wife, Suzanne Morphew, to help Trump win, saying “all these other guys are cheating” and that he thought his wife would have voted for Trump anyway, according to an arrest warrant affidavit signed by a judge in Chaffee county.

Trump and his supporters in the Republican party claim Joe Biden won the White House through mass electoral fraud – a lie repeatedly thrown out of court.

In December, the Washington Post reported that “only a handful of cases” of actual voter fraud had “resulted in criminal charges alleging wrongdoing”.

Some of the charges, it said, were “against Republican voters aiming to help Trump … including a man charged with trying to cast a ballot in Pennsylvania for the president in the name of his deceased mother”.

An arrest affidavit by an Chaffee county sheriff’s detective sergeant, Claudette Hysjulien, says the county clerk’s office received a suspicious mail ballot in Suzanne Morphew’s name in October.

Sheriff’s investigators saw the ballot, which had been mailed by the state to Suzanne Morphew, lacked Suzanne’s signature, as required by law. Barry Morphew had signed it as a witness.

Morphew was interviewed by two FBI agents about the ballot in April. Asked why he sent it, he told the agents, “Just because I wanted Trump to win,” according to the affidavit. “I just thought, give him another vote.”

Asked if he knew it was illegal to send someone else’s ballot, Morphew replied: “I didn’t know you couldn’t do that for your spouse.”

The affidavit says Morphew faces two new counts: felony forgery and misdemeanor ballot fraud. On Friday, Morphew was being advised of the new charges in Chaffee county district court.

June 02, 2021 4:33 PM  
Anonymous Happily married heterosexuals don't obsess over gay marriages said...

Then there is this guy who tried to "test the system":

https://www.local10.com/news/florida/2020/10/04/florida-man-who-tried-to-get-ballot-for-dead-wife-charged-with-fraud/

BRADENTON, Fla. – Florida authorities say they’ve filed a voter fraud charge against a man who said he said he “wanted to test the system” when he tried to obtain a mail-in ballot for his deceased wife.

Manatee County Supervisor of Elections Mike Bennett said he contacted the sheriff’s office after a review of voter rolls.

Bennett said his staff reviews the voter rolls for each mail-in ballot request and it was discovered the woman had been deceased for two years. They determined that Wiggins forged his late wife’s name on the ballot request, according to the Bradenton Herald.

Wiggins, who was arrested last Thursday on a voter fraud charge, told deputies that he was “testing the system to see if worked.”

“Our message is that the Manatee County Supervisor of Elections will prosecute any attempt at voter fraud. If you are caught, we are committed to prosecute,” Bennett said.


https://www.wfla.com/8-on-your-side/manatee-co-man-who-requested-ballot-for-dead-wife-i-feel-like-i-havent-done-anything-wrong/amp/

According to the arrest report, election officials received two vote-by-mail ballot request applications from a husband and wife.

Election officials confirmed the woman, Ursula Wiggins, had died in 2018.

They also said the signature on the woman’s application did not match the handwriting on her original voter registration documents.

Mr. Wiggins admits he filled out Ursula’s application and put it in the mail. However, he said he never planned on voting twice and says he didn’t try to duplicate his late wife’s signature.

“I said well, let me just send it in and see what’s going to happen to see if they’re actually going to send a ballot for her to vote,” said Mr. Wiggins.

Manatee County Elections Supervisor Michael Bennett didn’t send a ballot; instead, he sent deputies.

“It really maybe hasn’t set in on me totally,” said Mr. Wiggins, a self-described Democrat who supports President Donald Trump.

“Is he being used as a cautionary tale to warn others?” asked Investigative Reporter Mahsa Saeidi.

“If there’s nothing else that comes out of this conversation,” said Mr. Bennett, “… to warn other people.”

June 02, 2021 4:39 PM  
Anonymous Happily married heterosexuals don't obsess over gay marriages said...

Wow, all this voter fraud suspicion is really starting to look like another case of Republican PROJECTION:

https://www.businessinsider.com/voter-election-fraud-pennsylvania-charge-dead-mom-vote-trump-2020-12

Officials have found a case of a dead person voting.

Bruce Bartman has been charged with unlawful voting and perjury over allegations that he pretended to be his dead mother to cast a ballot in the November election for President Donald Trump in Pennsylvania.

Delaware County District Attorney Jack Stollsteimer announced the charges in a press release Monday. Bartman was arraigned Friday and released on $100,000 bail, according to The Philadelphia Inquirer. If convicted on all charges, the 70-year-old Bartman could spend up to 19 years in prison.

"This is the only known case of a 'dead person' voting in our county, conspiracy theories notwithstanding," Stollsteimer said in a statement. "Further, the prompt prosecution of this case shows that law enforcement will continue to uphold our election laws whenever presented with actual evidence of fraud and that we will continue to investigate every allegation that that comes our way."

Prosecutors said Bartman registered two dead people — his mother, Elizabeth Bartman, and his mother-in-law, Elizabeth Weihman — as Republican voters in August. He used the state's online voter-registration portal, which allows residents to register to vote using their driver's license number or the last four digits of their Social Security number, prosecutors said.

He used his mother-in-law's Social Security number to register, which was flagged in the state system as belonging to someone who is dead, prosecutors added, but the software sent a letter addressed to her to confirm whether she was alive. Bartman lied on the form and pretended to be Weihman, prosecutors said, but ultimately did not request an absentee ballot in her name.

Bartman also registered his dead mother to vote and successfully cast a ballot for Trump and other Republicans in her name, prosecutors said.

Voter fraud is extremely rare in the US. A database maintained by the conservative Heritage Foundation found only 193 convicted cases of voter fraud between 2000 and 2020, during which about 250 million votes were cast. Republicans frequently make baseless claims that voter fraud has a larger scope and scale, while pushing for laws that would make it harder for people to vote.

June 02, 2021 4:45 PM  
Anonymous Happily married heterosexuals don't obsess over gay marriages said...

Apparently they will even used DNA tests to check for voter fraud:

http://levittownnow.com/2021/05/01/two-bucks-county-women-to-be-charged-with-voter-fraud/

The investigation of nearly two dozen complaints related to the 2020 election in Bucks County has led to expected charges against two women.

The Bucks County District Attorney’s Office plans to file two separate charges of third-degree misdemeanor violations of provisions relating to absentee and mail-in ballots against a 56-year-old Buckingham Township woman and a 51-year-old Quakertown Borough woman.

The district attorney’s office posted a press release announcing the charges Friday evening, but quickly retracted it because the woman were not yet formally charged. LevittownNow.com typically only publishes defendant’s names once charges are filed or they are in police custody.

Although the two cases were similar they were not connected.

No fraudulent mail-in votes were counted, authorities said.

The Quakertown Borough woman signed the declaration on the ballot for her recently deceased mother, and the Buckingham Township woman signed the declaration on the ballot for her recently deceased mother, according to investigators.

A handwriting analysis in the cases determined the mothers’ of the women that will be charged did not sign the ballots, authorities said.

The district attorney’s office said they were not aware of the party registrations of the women charged or that of their late mothers. They also were not sure of who they voted for in the fraudulent ballots.

The Philadelphia Inquirer reported one of the women was a Democrat and the other a Republican.

In the statement that was prematurely released, District Attorney Matt Weintraub said the Bucks County Detectives investigated 22 complaints in the 2020 election season and found no “widespread or systematic election fraud here in Bucks County.” The district attorney said the complaints ranged from residency problems, voter intimidation, threats to election officials, and possible ballot tampering. Referrals came from a number of sources, including politicos, residents, and other government agencies. No other charges related to the election in Bucks County have been filed at the county, state, or federal level.

“In some of these investigations, the detectives obtained DNA samples from ballots and voters for analysis, took handwriting samples from voters, prepared and served search warrants for IP addresses for electronic mail-in-ballot application submissions, reviewed video surveillance of county government facilities, contacted and spoke to postal carriers, and contacted and spoke to FBI agents assigned to voter irregularities,” the news release said.

In Bucks County, close to 390,000 votes were cast in the 2020 general election and about 164,000 of them were mail-in or absente ballots.

Following the November 2020 election, then-President Donald Trump’s campaign said in court that there was no evidence of fraud, misconduct, impropriety, and undue influence in Bucks County’s election. Local Democrats and Republicans made similar statements that there was no fraud. Federal, state and local law enforcement and security officials have reported no evidence of widespread fraud across the state or nation.

June 02, 2021 5:01 PM  
Anonymous Oops, God's judgement didn't land where he expected said...

Right-wing pastor gets Covid after saying vaccines were part of 'mass death campaign'

A right-wing Florida pastor was hospitalized with Covid-19, weeks after saying vaccination efforts were part of a "mass death campaign."

The pastor, Rick Wiles, wrote Tuesday on TruNews.com, where he propagates homophobic, racist and other hateful conspiracy theories, that he had Covid-19-related pneumonia and difficulty breathing. He said that he was being released from the hospital later that day but that his wife was "still very fatigued."

He added that his daughter-in-law was in the hospital with extreme dehydration and vomiting and that at least four other family members, including his grandson, had developed Covid-19-related symptoms. At least three TruNews team members were also recovering from the virus, he wrote.

"This was a full-frontal hit from Hell on your TruNews family," Wiles wrote. "Because Jesus Christ lives in us, we shall live too. Your prayers needed for the above family members and team.

"Thanks to Jesus Christ, I survived the CCP Covid genocide on the American people," he added, apparently referring to the Chinese Communist Party.

About a month ago, Wiles said he was "not going to be vaccinated."

"I'm going to be one of the survivors. I'm going to survive the genocide," he said in an interview posted to TruNews. "I am not going to allow the Covid maniacs to convince me to be vaccinated or vaccinate me against my will."

"I know what I'm reading. I know what I'm seeing," Wiles said, adding that "there is a mass death campaign underway right now" and that "the only good thing that will come out of this is that a lot of stupid people will be killed off."

Wiles is the pastor of Flowing Streams Church, a nondenominational congregation in Vero Beach, Florida.

In January 2020, he said Covid-19 was God's way of punishing China for having a "godless communist government."

He warned that God's judgment would come down on America because of "the spiritual rebellion that is in this country," including "transgendering little children."

June 02, 2021 6:41 PM  
Anonymous BLS said...

Employment Situation Summary
Transmission of material in this news release is embargoed until USDL-21-0980
8:30 a.m. (ET) Friday, June 4, 2021

Technical information:
Household data: cpsinfo@bls.gov * www.bls.gov/cps
Establishment data: cesinfo@bls.gov * www.bls.gov/ces

Media contact: (202) 691-5902 * PressOffice@bls.gov


THE EMPLOYMENT SITUATION -- MAY 2021


Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 559,000 in May, and the unemployment rate
declined by 0.3 percentage point to 5.8 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
reported today. Notable job gains occurred in leisure and hospitality, in public and
private education, and in health care and social assistance.

June 04, 2021 2:51 PM  
Anonymous non-binary folks are non compos mentis said...

""Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 559,000 in May, and the unemployment rate
declined by 0.3 percentage point to 5.8 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
reported today. Notable job gains occurred in leisure and hospitality, in public and
private education, and in health care and social assistance."

thanks for posting

the economic boom began in the last months of the Trump term continues, offering further proof that the last thing America needs is to crush it with excessive new taxes and inflation-inducing Federal borrowing

the current low tax rates are what gives our economy the resiliency to bounce back from a year of crippling and unnecessary restrictions while socialist Europe flounders

June 05, 2021 5:52 AM  
Anonymous homosexuality never produces life, two of 'em ain't ever a marriage said...

"The pandemic is raging, and with unvaccinated people going into crowds without masks you can be sure we will see a spike in infections,"

still waiting for that surge TTF is sure we will see

June 06, 2021 6:28 AM  
Anonymous I wonder if there is any part of the Constitution that TTFers feel they can live with... said...

kind of like Fauci

sure it wasn't airborne

sure masks are useless

sure it didn't come from a lab

sure...

he's a liar

June 06, 2021 6:32 AM  
Anonymous At least 53 percent of Republicans don't believe in democracy anymore said...

In a column for MSNBC, longtime conservative commentator Charlie Sykes hammered Donald Trump for promoting the improbable scenario that he will be "reinstated" as president in August, with Sykes saying Trump is continuing to trap the Republican Party in a "doom loop of craziness" that threatens the entire country.

According to Sykes, one of the founders of the conservative Bulwark, Trump reportedly believes he will displace President Joe Biden through some unspecified machinations and that the former president's actions are unconscionable and dangerous.

"That, of course, is not going to happen. It is, in fact, weapons-grade lunacy to imagine that it is even possible," Sykes wrote. "It should also remind us that even though an idea is fake, the consequences of a new Big Lie can be very real, and even deadly. Delegitimizing our democracy is now central to Trump's agenda and his hopes for a political comeback. And polls suggest that his lies about the election have influenced tens of millions of voters."

Noting a poll that shows that 53 percent of Republicans believe Trump is the "true president" of the United States," Sykes added, "In this alternative reality, it's only a small step to believe their 'true president' might really return."

"It's impossible to know whether Trump genuinely believes that he can move back into the White House this summer. But that's not the point; the story works for him as long as other people believe it," The columnist explained. "So don't be surprised if this notion gathers momentum in the right's feedback loop, especially if Trump continues to stoke false hopes."

According to Sykes, American's shouldn't take what Trump is currently doing lightly because it feeds into the hopes of conspiracy-obsessed -- and potentially dangerous -- Trump supporters like those who stormed the Capitol on Jan 6th.

"Meanwhile, belief in Trump's return will spread among members of the base, sparking anger, suspicion and outrage when the promised restoration fails to materialize," he wrote before warning, "In other words, it's a new twist on the same Big Lie that fueled the Jan. 6 insurrection and continues to fuel threats of political violence. That makes it even worse than it looks."

June 06, 2021 9:46 AM  
Anonymous Timeline of Trump’s Coronavirus Responses said...

May 2018

The Trump Administration disbands the White House pandemic response team.

July 2019

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) epidemiologist embedded in China’s disease control agency left the post, and the Trump Administration eliminated the role.

Oct. 2019

“Currently, there are insufficient funding sources designated for the federal government to use in response to a severe influenza pandemic.” [Source: The results of a Department of Health and Human Services 2019 influenza pandemic simulation]

Jan. 22, 2020

“We have it totally under control. It’s one person coming in from China. It’s going to be just fine.”

Jan. 24, 2020

Trump praises China’s handling of the coronavirus: “China has been working very hard to contain the Coronavirus. The United States greatly appreciates their efforts and transparency. It will all work out well. In particular, on behalf of the American People, I want to thank President Xi!”

Jan. 28, 2020

“This will be the biggest national security threat you face in your presidency...This is going to be the roughest thing you face" Trump’s National Security Advisor to Trump

Jan. 30, 2020

"The lack of immune protection or an existing cure or vaccine would leave Americans defenseless in the case of a full-blown coronavirus outbreak on US soil,...This lack of protection elevates the risk of the coronavirus evolving into a full-blown pandemic, imperiling the lives of millions of Americans.” [Memo from Trump Trade Advisor Peter Navarro]

Feb. 2, 2020

“We pretty much shut it down coming in from China.”

Feb. 7, 2020

“It’s also more deadly than even your strenuous flu... This is deadly stuff” [Trump in a private interview with Bob Woodward from The Washington Post made public on Sept. 9, 2020]

Feb. 10, 2020

“I think the virus is going to be—it’s going to be fine.”

Feb. 10, 2020

“Looks like by April, you know in theory when it gets a little warmer, it miraculously goes away.”

June 06, 2021 9:51 AM  
Anonymous Timeline of Trump’s Coronavirus Responses said...

Feb. 24, 2020

“The Coronavirus is very much under control in the USA… the Stock Market starting to look very good to me!”

Feb. 25, 2020

“CDC and my Administration are doing a GREAT job of handling Coronavirus.”

Feb. 25, 2020

“I think that's a problem that’s going to go away… They have studied it. They know very much. In fact, we’re very close to a vaccine.”

Feb. 26, 2020

“The 15 (cases in the US) within a couple of days is going to be down to close to zero.”
Feb. 26, 2020

“We're going very substantially down, not up.”

Feb. 26, 2020

“Well, we're testing everybody that we need to test. And we're finding very little problem. Very little problem.”

Feb. 26, 2020

"This is a flu. This is like a flu."

Feb. 27, 2020

“It’s going to disappear. One day, it’s like a miracle, it will disappear.”

Feb. 27, 2020

“The ineptness with which the Trump Administration approached this problem is not only serious, it can be deadly if not changed in the approach.” – Rep. Lloyd Doggett [During a hearing, Rep. Doggett questions HHS Sec. Azar on Trump's refusal to take this virus seriously, warning about mask and test shortages]

Feb. 28, 2020

“We're ordering a lot of supplies. We're ordering a lot of, uh, elements that frankly we wouldn't be ordering unless it was something like this. But we're ordering a lot of different elements of medical.”

March 2, 2020

“You take a solid flu vaccine, you don't think that could have an impact, or much of an impact, on corona?” [Trump to health officials who answered "No."]

March 2, 2020

“A lot of things are happening, a lot of very exciting things are happening and they’re happening very rapidly.”

March 4, 2020

“Now, and this is just my hunch, and — but based on a lot of conversations with a lot of people that do this. Because a lot people will have this and it's very mild.”

March 4, 2020

“If we have thousands or hundreds of thousands of people that get better just by, you know, sitting around and even going to work — some of them go to work, but they get better.”

March 5, 2020

“I NEVER said people that are feeling sick should go to work.”

March 5, 2020

“The United States… has, as of now, only 129 cases… and 11 deaths. We are working very hard to keep these numbers as low as possible!”

June 06, 2021 9:53 AM  
Anonymous Timeline of Trump’s Coronavirus Responses said...

March 6, 2020

“I think we’re doing a really good job in this country at keeping it down… a tremendous job at keeping it down.”

March 6, 2020

“You have to be calm. It’ll go away.”

March 6, 2020

“Anybody right now, and yesterday, anybody that needs a test gets a test. They’re there. And the tests are beautiful…. the tests are all perfect like the letter was perfect. The transcription was perfect. Right? This was not as perfect as that but pretty good.”

March 6, 2020

“I like this stuff. I really get it. People are surprised that I understand it… Every one of these doctors said, ‘How do you know so much about this?’ Maybe I have a natural ability. Maybe I should have done that instead of running for president.”

March 6, 2020

“I don't need to have the numbers double because of one ship that wasn't our fault.”

March 7, 2020

“No, I’m not concerned at all.

March 8, 2020

“We have a perfectly coordinated and fine-tuned plan at the White House for our attack on CoronaVirus.”

March 9, 2020

During a news conference, White House officials said the U.S. will have tested one million people that week and thereafter would complete 4 million tests per week. By the end of the week, the CDC had only completed a paltry 4,000 tests.

March 10, 2020

“Just stay calm. It will go away.”

March 11, 2020

The World Health Organization categorizes the coronavirus as a pandemic due to its alarming spread and severity.

March 11, 2020

“It goes away….It’s going away. We want it to go away with very, very few deaths.”

March 12, 2020

“The system is not really geared to what we need right now...That is a failing. Let’s admit it.” [Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to Congress]

March 12, 2020

"You know, you see what's going on. And so I just wanted that to stop as it pertains to the United States. And that's what we've done. We've stopped it."

June 06, 2021 9:55 AM  
Anonymous Timeline of Trump’s Coronavirus Responses said...

March 13, 2020

“I don’t take responsibility at all.”

March 13, 2020

The Atlantic reports that less than 14,000 tests have been done in the ten weeks since the Administration had first been notified of the virus, though Mike Pence had promised the week prior that 1.5 million tests would be available by this time.

March 14, 2020

“I’d rate it a ten,” [Trump’s rating of his coronavirus response]

March 15, 2020

“Relax”

March 15, 2020

“This is a very contagious virus. It’s incredible. But it’s something that we have tremendous control over.”

March 16, 2020

“Respirators, ventilators, all of the equipment-try getting it yourselves,”

March 17, 2020

“The only thing we haven’t done well is get good press.”

March 17, 2020

“I felt like it was a pandemic long before it was called a pandemic.”

March 19, 2020

I intended "to always play it down.” [Trump in a private taped interview with Bob Woodward, made public on September 9]

March 20, 2020

“I say that you're a terrible reporter, that's what I say. I think it's a very nasty question, and I think it's a very bad signal that you're putting out to the American people." [Response to reporter’s question: "What do you say to Americans who are watching you right now who are scared?"]

March 22, 2020

“WE CANNOT LET THE CURE BE WORSE THAN THE PROBLEM ITSELF.”

March 24, 2020

“I'm also hopeful to have Americans working again by that Easter - that beautiful Easter day.”

March 24, 2020

“We’ve never closed down the country for the flu,” Trump said. “So you say to yourself, what is this all about?”

March 24, 2020

“They have to treat us well, also. They can’t say, ‘Oh, gee, we should get this, we should get that.’”

March 25, 2020

“The faster we go back, the better it’s going to be.”

March 26, 2020

The United States becomes the country with the most confirmed coronavirus cases. A title it keeps for the remainder of Trump's time in office.

June 06, 2021 9:57 AM  
Anonymous Timeline of Trump’s Coronavirus Responses said...

March 26, 2020

“Congratulations AMERICA!” [On Senate passage of third relief bill]

March 26, 2020

“I don't believe you need 40,000 or 30,000 ventilators. You go into major hospitals sometimes, and they’ll have two ventilators. And now all of a sudden they’re saying, ‘Can we order 30,000 ventilators?’”

March 26, 2020

“We’ve had a big problem with the young, a woman governor from — you know who I’m talking about — from Michigan,”

March 27, 2020

“I love Michigan, one of the reasons we are doing such a GREAT job for them during this horrible Pandemic. Yet your Governor, Gretchen “Half” Whitmer is way in over her head, she doesn’t have a clue. Likes blaming everyone for her own ineptitude!”

March 27, 2020

“Mike, don’t call the governor of Washington. You’re wasting your time with him…”

March 27, 2020

“I want them to be appreciative. We've done a great job.”

March 27, 2020

“We’re doing a great job for the state of Washington and I think the Governor...he’s constantly chirping and I guess complaining would be a nice way of saying it.”

March 29, 2020

“Where are the masks going? Are they going out the back door? How do you go from 10,000 to 300,000?”

March 29, 2020

“Unfortunately the enemy is death. It's death. A lot of people are dying. So it's very unpleasant.”

March 30, 2020

"Stay calm, it will go away. You know it -- you know it is going away, and it will go away, and we're going to have a great victory."

March 30, 2020

“I think New York should be fine, based on the numbers that we see, they should have more than enough. I mean, I’m hearing stories that they’re not used or they’re not used right.”

March 30, 2020

“I haven’t heard about testing in weeks. We’re testing more than any other nation in the world. We’ve got these great tests...But I haven’t heard about testing being a problem.”

March 30, 2020

“We inherited a broken test — the whole thing was broken.”

March 31, 2020

“...it’s not the flu. It’s vicious.”

June 06, 2021 10:00 AM  
Anonymous Timeline of Trump’s Coronavirus Responses said...

April 1, 2020

"They have to treat us well, also. They can't say, 'Oh, gee, we should get this, we should get that." [Trump's response to governors who were pleading for medical gear and ventilators to treat surging coronavirus hospitalizations]

April 2, 2020

“Massive amounts of medical supplies... are being delivered directly to states...Some have insatiable appetites & are never satisfied (politics?). The complainers should have been stocked up and ready long before this crisis hit.”

April 2, 2020

“...the Federal Government is merely a back-up for state governments.”

April 3, 2020

“I’m feeling good. I just don’t want to be doing -- somehow sitting in the Oval Office behind that beautiful resolute desk, the great resolute desk, I think wearing a face mask as I greet presidents, prime ministers, dictators, kings, queens, I don’t know, somehow I don’t see it for myself. I just don’t. Maybe I’ll change my mind.”

April 5, 2020

“FEMA, the military — what they’ve done is a miracle...And you should be thanking them for what they’ve done, not always asking wise-guy questions.” [Trump's response to a reporter when asked about slow government response to coronavirus]

April 6, 2020

“LIGHT AT THE END OF THE TUNNEL!”

April 6, 2020

U.S. death toll passes 10,000

April 7, 2020

"So, you know, things are happening. It's a -- it's -- I haven't seen bad. I've not seen bad."

April 7, 2020

"You are not going to die from this pill...I really think it's a great thing to try." [Trump promoting Hydroxychloroquine, not FDA approved to treat coronavirus]

April 7, 2020

“That was a flu. OK. So you could say that I said it was a flu, or you could say the flu is nothing to -- sneeze at," [Regarding Spanish Flu]

April 8, 2020

"I read about it maybe a day, two days ago,...It was a recommendation that he had, I think he told certain people on the staff, but it didn't matter. I didn't see it." [Trump referring to Peter Navarro’s January warning]

April 9, 2020

“I couldn’t have done it any better,” [When asked if his coronavirus response could have been better]

April 11, 2020

U.S. death toll passes 20,000

June 06, 2021 10:02 AM  
Anonymous Timeline of Trump’s Coronavirus Responses said...

April 13, 2020

“But I guess I'm doing OK, because, to the best of my knowledge, I'm the President of the United States, despite the things that are said."

April 14, 2020

“Enough!” [When a reporter questioned his claim that his authority as president is “total”]

April 14, 2020

“[w]hen somebody’s the president of the United States, the authority is total.”

April 15, 2020

U.S. death toll passes 30,000

April 15, 2020

As Trump focuses on reopening, a leaked CDC and FEMA report warns of “significant risk of resurgence of the virus” with phased reopening.

April 19, 2020

“Now we’re going toward 50, I’m hearing, or 60,000 people [dead from the coronavirus]”

April 20, 2020

U.S. death toll passes 40,000

April 22, 2020

“If [coronavirus] comes back though, it won’t be coming back in the form that it was, it will be coming back in smaller doses that we can contain….it’s also possible it doesn’t come back at all.”

April 23, 2020

"I see the disinfectant that knocks it out in a minute, one minute. And is there a way we can do something like that by injection inside or almost a cleaning? As you see, it gets in the lungs, it does a tremendous number on the lungs, so it would be interesting to check that."

April 23, 2020

“So, supposing we hit the body with a tremendous, whether its ultraviolet or just very powerful light, and I think you said, that hasn't been checked but you're gonna test it. And then I said, supposing it brought the light inside the body, which you can either do either through the skin or some other way…”

April 23, 2020

“You see states are starting to open up now, and it’s very exciting to see,”

April 23, 2020

Over 26 million jobless claims have been filed

April 24, 2020

U.S. death toll passes 50,000

June 06, 2021 10:03 AM  
Anonymous Timeline of Trump’s Coronavirus Responses said...

April 26, 2020

“The people that know me and know the history of our Country say that I am the hardest working President in history.”

April 27, 2020

"I can't imagine why," [Trump’s response to the influx in poison control calls about disinfectant]

April 29, 2020

U.S. death toll passes 60,000

April 29, 2020

“It’s gonna go away, this is going to go away.”

May 3, 2020

“Look, we're going to lose anywhere from 75,000, 80,000 to 100,000 people,”

May 5, 2020

U.S. death toll passes 70,000

May 5, 2020

Consumer debt hits an all-time high

May 5, 2020

“Well run States should not be bailing out poorly run States, using CoronaVirus as the excuse!”

May 5, 2020

“I always felt 60, 65, 70, as horrible as that is. I mean, you’re talking about filling up Yankee Stadium with death! So I thought it was horrible. But it’s probably going to be somewhat higher than that,”

May 5, 2020

“There’ll be more death, that the virus will pass, with or without a vaccine. And I think we’re doing very well on the vaccines but, with or without a vaccine, it’s going to pass, and we’re going to be back to normal,”

May 5, 2020

“I don’t want to be Mr. Gloom-and-Doom. It’s a very bad subject,...I’m not looking to tell the American people when nobody really knows what’s happening yet, ‘Oh, this is going to be so tragic.’”

May 6, 2020

The Brookings Institution reports that children were “experiencing food insecurity to an extent unprecedented in modern times” and “40.9 percent of mothers with children ages 12 and under reported household food insecurity since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.” Republicans block proposals to expand food stamps.

May 6, 2020

“Sporadic for you, but not sporadic for a lot of other people.” [Trump’s response to a nurse telling him that equipment supply has been “sporadic”]

May 7, 2020

Over 33 million jobless claims have been filed

May 8, 2020

“This is going to go away without a vaccine. It is going to go away. We are not going to see it again.”

May 9, 2020

“This is going to go away without a vaccine.”

May 11, 2020

U.S. death toll passes 80,000

June 06, 2021 10:05 AM  
Anonymous JULIA DUIN said...

Perched on a cream-colored armchair, Johnny Enlow, a 61-year-old, California-based Pentecostal pastor with short-cropped gray hair, a trim beard and Tom Selleck-style mustache, looked into the camera and prophesied that Donald Trump would become president again.

Not in 2024. In 2021.


“The January 20 inauguration date doesn’t really mean anything,” Enlow said in the January 29 video, which has gotten north of 100,000 views on YouTube. According to Enlow, more than 100 other “credible” Christian prophets around the world had likewise declared that Trump, somehow, would be restored to power soon.

Indeed, Enlow was not alone out on that limb. Greg Locke, a Nashville pastor with a massive social media following, said after Trump’s loss that he would “100 percent remain president of the United States for another term.” Kat Kerr, a pink-haired preacher from Jacksonville, Florida, declared repeatedly last month that Trump had won the election “by a landslide” and that God had told her he would serve for eight years. In his video, Enlow went further. “There’s not going to be just Trump coming back,” he said. “There’s going to be at least two more Trumps that will be in office in some way.” Donald Trump, he proclaimed elsewhere, was “the primary government leader on Planet Earth.”


Enlow, Locke and Kerr are among dozens of Christian prophets in America—religious leaders with followings among Pentecostal and charismatic Christians who claim the ability to predict the future based on dreams, visions and other supernatural phenomena. Some prophets are church leaders, while others operate independently. There are no official requirements for prophet status, though followers generally expect prophets to get at least a few prophecies right.

But, lately, that standard has come under duress—particularly when it comes to Donald Trump.

In 2015, spurred by the lengthy prophecy of a 27-year-old wunderkind named Jeremiah Johnson, many Pentecostals and charismatics embraced the idea that God had chosen Trump to restore America’s Christian moorings. Trump’s surprise win in 2016 offered a dramatic validation, and in 2020 dozens of prophets declared that he would win election again. This time, they were wrong. Yet, in the wake of Joe Biden’s victory, instead of apologizing or backtracking, a number of prophets continue to assert that it is God’s will for Trump to be in the White House and that a miraculous reversal is nigh. Enlow, who did not respond to a request for comment for this article, has said Trump’s victory will be made clear by March.

With only two-thirds of voters—and one-third of Republicans—expressing confidence that Biden won a free and fair election, many observers worry that these prophets are sowing more confusion, blurring the line between misinformation and religious proclamation. They are spreading their message to wide audiences—some preachers who amplify these prophecies have followings in the millions—that increasingly exist in an echo chamber of like-minded religious YouTube channels, Instagram feeds and websites such as ElijahList, host of the YouTube channel ElijahStreams, where Enlow’s video aired.

June 06, 2021 11:26 AM  
Anonymous JULIA DUIN said...

It’s well known that Trump received strong support from white evangelicals in the 2020 election; estimates hover around 80 percent. But the role that prophecy plays in that support might be underexplored. In a survey conducted last year, two political scientists found that nearly half of America’s church-attending white Protestants believed Trump was anointed by God to be president—a portion of the population that other scholars have dubbed “prophecy voters.” The share is likely higher among charismatic Christians, who skew more politically and theologically conservative than evangelicals as a whole. And although this population is only a subset of American Christianity, it’s a large one: Some estimates hold that as many as 65 million Americans could be counted as Pentecostals or charismatics.

Not all prophets have doubled down on their Trump prophecies since the election, however. And as some have backed away from Trump, a schism has emerged. At least six recognized prophets who initially predicted a Trump reelection have acknowledged those prophecies were wrong. They now say they are deeply troubled by their peers’ refusal to acknowledge the same—and worry that allegiance to Trump could threaten the prophetic tradition itself.

In a December 15 article, Michael Brown, a longtime charismatic revivalist and scholar in Charlotte, North Carolina, had sharp words, warning co-religionists: “There is no reality in which Trump actually did win but in fact didn’t win. … To entertain possibilities like this is to mock the integrity of prophecy and to make us charismatics look like total fools.” After apologizing on January 7 for his own prophecy that Trump would be reelected, Jeremiah Johnson called parts of the prophetic movement “deeply sick.” In early February, he released a new YouTube series called “I Was Wrong: Donald Trump and the Prophetic Controversy.”

“I believe that this election cycle has revealed how desperately we need reformation in the prophetic movement,” Johnson said in a February 8 video. “I have serious concerns for the charismatic-prophetic world that if we do not wake up, if we do not humble ourselves, there is greater judgment to come.”

The emerging rift mirrors the one in the GOP, with one faction trying to move on from Trump in the name of democratic principles, and the other redoubling their commitment to him, spurred by the grassroots and in defiance of facts. Johnson and other prophets in his camp have received fervent pushback from their followers. But Brown and his ilk believe a reckoning is in order—that false prophets must be held accountable and that reforms are needed if the prophecy movement is to retain any spiritual integrity. He has begun convening monthly Zoom calls with prophetic leaders to discuss a way forward.

“This has opened the door to outright delusion,” Brown said in an interview. “As a full-blooded charismatic, I’ll say we’ve earned the world’s mockery for our foolishness.”

June 06, 2021 11:28 AM  
Anonymous JULIA DUIN said...

On November 7, the day Biden was declared the president-elect, one prophet, Kris Vallotton, of the mega-congregation Bethel Church in Redding, California, notably apologized. “I take full responsibility for being wrong,” he said on Instagram. “There was no excuse for it. I think it doesn’t make me a false prophet, but it does actually create a credibility gap.”

But dozens of Pentecostal prophets dug in, insisting, even after the Electoral College vote certifying Biden’s win, that Trump would still be inaugurated.

In addition to Kerr, Enlow and Locke, there was South Carolina prophet Dutch Sheets, who announced a seven-state “prayer tour” to sites where the votes were being contested. “We believe we can win this battle,” he said. Jeff Jansen, a Murfreesboro, Tennessee, prophet, appeared on ElijahStreams to echo Enlow’s prophecy of a Trump dynasty. “The last Trump will be Barron,” Jansen said. “He is going to be one of the greatest presidents of the United States.”

According to local media reports and social media feeds, a handful of prophets traveled to Washington for Trump’s speech on January 6. They included North Carolina evangelist Charlie Shamp, who tweeted a photo of himself just below the steps where crowds were storming the Capitol and produced a video about the experience. “Don’t let the media lie to you,” Shamp later wrote, from a Twitter account that has since been deleted. (He has moved to Parler.) “We peacefully assembled outside the building to voice our protest against this fraudulent election and pray for America!”

Within a day of the Capitol insurrection, a few other prophets who had prophesied a Trump win apologized: Johnson, as well as California pastor Shawn Bolz and Denver pastor Loren Sandford. Johnson published a long explanation, saying he had “misinterpreted” dreams and wished to “repent and ask your forgiveness.”

“I do not blame God’s people for insufficient prayer that resulted in Donald Trump’s losing the election, nor do I blame any kind of election fraud,” he wrote. “I am simply convinced God Himself removed him and there was nothing that any human being could have done about it.”

Blowback was swift. A few days later, Johnson wrote on Facebook that he had received “multiple death threats and thousands upon thousands of emails from Christians saying the nastiest and most vulgar things I have ever heard toward my family and ministry.” He also said he was losing financial support “every hour and counting.” (Johnson declined an interview request made through Brown, a mentor.)

“He lost a lot of monthly support,” Brown told me. “He said people were unsubscribing from his email list at such a high rate, it crashed his server.”

A few more apologies followed. Vallotton, who had retracted his apology after hearing from “thousands” of angry followers, reinstated it on January 8. Talk show host Sid Roth, as well as Jennifer LeClaire, the former editor of Charisma magazine (whose publisher, Stephen Strang, predicted that Trump would top 400 electors), also apologized, with LeClaire writing: “I believe some prophets who prophesied a Trump win never heard God at all. They merely tapped into the popular prophetic opinion because it was what so many in the church wanted to hear.”

Comments like these have prompted discussions around the charismatic world on podcasts, email threads, Twitter and Facebook. The overriding emotion in reading them is anger at the prophets—in some cases, for making false declarations and, in other cases, for apologizing for those declarations. Brown told me pastors have reached out to him asking how to handle the fallout in their congregations. Goll used words like “toxic,” “mudslinging,” “disappointment” and “disillusion” to describe the flood of invective from Christians who feel duped by false prophecies. But a sizable share of believers, at least those active online, seem to be holding out for a Trump resurrection sometime this spring.

June 06, 2021 11:35 AM  
Anonymous JULIA DUIN said...

That has left prophets like Johnson and LeClaire calling on Pentecostal and charismatic Christians to rethink what prophecy should and should not be in the 21st century. So far, they and other movement leaders have opted to address false prophets privately. “Some people are spoken to and don’t respond. Some people respond quickly,” Goll says.

That’s not enough for Rosebrough, who doesn’t see the movement reforming itself unless it can call out false prophets by name. “There are never any efforts to validate any of the claims made,” he says. “The more outrageous the claims, the truer it has to be. And if you are critical of these things, God will curse you as opposing his prophets.” (On February 11, Enlow hit back, slamming the would-be reformers with a statement titled “An Apostolic Rebuke and Entreaty for Those Blaming the Prophets.”)

Beverley, the Tyndale University professor, worries the widespread fidelity to Trump prophecies is part of a broader embrace of conspiratorial thinking in America. In a new book, he links the prophetic movement to the far-right QAnon conspiracy: Leaders of both, he says, have said all along that Trump would win and continue to push the idea that this will happen in March. Beverly, however, believes the charismatic prophets are likely to move on if nothing happens at that point.

But Brown is not counting on it. On February 8, he and Brooklyn pastor Joseph Mattera began organizing secret monthly meetings over Zoom with a new confederation of 20 prophetic leaders, representing various streams of the movement across ethnic, racial and denominational lines. Their aim is to set up guidelines for public prophecies and requirements for accountability. One idea: The group could demand that anyone who wants its imprimatur needs to sign on to certain rules. Those who don’t “will be left out of our circles,” as Brown puts it.

Yet even Brown admits these measures will go only so far, given the extent to which the evangelical church has become entwined with Trump’s strain of politics. “How did we become so politicized?” he wonders. “How did so many of us end up with an almost a cultlike devotion to a leader, compromise our ethics for a seat at the table and drape the Gospel in an American flag?”

June 06, 2021 11:39 AM  
Anonymous Republicans don't really believe in the Constitution, that's why they're trying to nullify so many Democrat votes said...

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, a Republican, said former President Donald Trump would have lost in Texas in the 2020 election if his office had not successfully blocked counties from mailing out applications for mail-in ballots to all registered voters.

Harris County, home to the city of Houston, wanted to mail out applications for mail-in ballots to its approximately 2.4 million registered voters due to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the conservative Texas Supreme Court blocked the county from doing so after it faced litigation from Paxton's office.

"If we'd lost Harris County—Trump won by 620,000 votes in Texas. Harris County mail-in ballots that they wanted to send out were 2.5 million, those were all illegal and we were able to stop every one of them," Paxton told former Trump adviser Steve Bannon during the latter's War Room podcast on Friday.

Had we not done that, we would have been in the very same situation—we would've been on Election Day, I was watching on election night and I knew, when I saw what was happening in these other states, that that would've been Texas. We would've been in the same boat. We would've been one of those battleground states that they were counting votes in Harris County for three days and Donald Trump would've lost the election," the Republican official said.

Notably, the Texas attorney general conflated mail-in ballots with applications for mail-in ballots in his remarks to Bannon. Harris County did not attempt to mail actual ballots to registered voters—just applications to request them if the individual voter wanted one.

As Paxton pointed out, Trump carried the traditionally conservative southwestern state by more than 600,000 votes. While President Joe Biden won 46.5 percent of the state's more than 11.3 million votes, Trump won about 52.1 percent. Polling ahead of the election had suggested that Biden had a shot at flipping the red state, which last went for a Democratic presidential candidate in 1976.

A 2020 analysis of U.S. election laws by Northern Illinois University ranked Texas as the most difficult state for voting. While absentee voting is allowed in the state for anyone over the age of 65 without an excuse, the state requires those younger to have a valid reason for requesting an absentee ballot. While Democrats believed the COVID-19 pandemic should be an acceptable excuse for any registered voter to cast their ballots by mail, Paxton and other Texas Republicans disagreed.

Meanwhile, GOP lawmakers in Texas want to make it more difficult to vote in the state. Their efforts have been largely animated by Trump's baseless claims that Biden won the 2020 election through widespread voter fraud. These false allegations have already been thoroughly litigated and wholly debunked, while the former president and his allies have failed to provide evidence to substantiate them.

June 08, 2021 1:35 PM  
Anonymous I wonder if TTFers agree with any part of the Constitution.... said...

https://www.aol.com/lifestyle/judge-reinstates-teacher-suspended-transgender-191524747-221730228.html

June 09, 2021 10:48 AM  
Anonymous fringe won't win: backlash in progress said...

courts stand up against unconstitutional transgender demands that teachers have to support their fringe viewpoint:

https://www.aol.com/lifestyle/judge-reinstates-teacher-suspended-transgender-191524747-221730228.html

June 10, 2021 12:15 PM  
Anonymous is a mental problem? said...

head of the transgenders in America says he wants to be just like Trump!:

https://www.newsweek.com/caitlyn-jenner-refuses-say-if-trump-lost-election-wants-disrupter-like-him-1599513?%20utm_source=pushnami&utm_medium=Push_Notifications&utm_campaign=automatic&UTM=1623428729638

June 11, 2021 12:54 PM  
Anonymous Republicans think if they lose the election they can throw out the Constitution along with a bunch of votes said...

Conservative pundit Charlie Sykes on Thursday cautioned against dismissing the Arizona state Senate GOP’s partisan audit of the 2020 election.

Sykes told MSNBC’s Nicolle Wallace that “the beating heart” of the GOP was to embrace ex-President Donald Trump’s lie that he actually beat President Joe Biden “and to use that then as an excuse to change the laws,” referencing Republican-sponsored voter suppression measures in many U.S. states.

“As we’ve said before, we can roll our eyes and treat the Arizona audit as a joke, but a clown with a flamethrower still has a flamethrower,” said Sykes, founder of the conservative website The Bulwark.

“We are post-evidence. There is no logical connection to it except that this has now become gospel in the Republican Party,” he added. “And it is not just Arizona. I think that the latest count you had legislatures from seven states visit this Arizona audit, so what you’re seeing here is about to metastasize across the country.”

June 11, 2021 1:19 PM  
Anonymous MAGA hatters said...

The 56-year-old Hostetter and five other men from the Orange County area ― Russell Taylor, 40, Erik Warner, 45, Felipe Martinez, 47, Derek Kinnison, 39, and Ronald Mele, 51 ― were accused of entering into a conspiracy to “corruptly obstruct, influence, and impede the Congressional proceeding at the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021.”

The 20-page indictment is the first conspiracy indictment involving multiple defendants the government says are affiliated with the Three Percenters, the right-wing group that derives its name from the (mistaken) belief that just three percent of colonialists stood up against the British during the American Revolution.

The men’s indictment was unsealed five months after the Jan. 6 Capitol attack. Federal authorities are closing in on 500 arrests in connection with the insurrection; 300 additional suspects have their photos featured on the FBI’s Capitol wanted page, and there are an untold number of other solid cases against Capitol suspects within the FBI’s database of hundreds of thousands of tips received from the public.

The feds estimated that about 2,000 people were involved in the Capitol breach. New federal charges continue to roll in on a near-daily basis, and there are plenty more arrests in the works.

What the indictment doesn’t mention is this: As Twitter users chronicled his actions, Hostetter wrote them eerie, borderline-threatening tweets. “I know your name,” he wrote in one February Twitter reply to a Twitter investigator who wrote that they’d “love to chat sometime” about how Hostetter’s crew carried bags and weapons to the Capitol.

On the eve of the Capitol attack, Taylor spoke at a Virginia Women for Trump rally at the U.S. Capitol as part of an American Phoenix Project panel. He called himself a “free American” and said he would “fight” and “bleed” before allowing freedom to be taken.

“These anti-Americans have made the fatal mistake,” Taylor said. “They have brought out the patriots’ fury onto these streets and they did so without knowing that we will not return to our peaceful way of life until this election is made right, our freedoms are restored, and America is preserved.”

The next day, the indictment alleges, the men made good on their rhetoric. Warner entered the building through a broken window. Taylor and Hostetter joined the mob pushing through the police line, with Taylor warning officers it was their “last chance” to “move back.”

Martinez and Kinnison made their way to the Upper West Terrace of the Capitol Building too, while Mele shot a selfie video.

June 11, 2021 1:21 PM  
Anonymous Poor babies -- emotionally vulnerable, misunderstood, or otherwise stressed. said...

“For researchers on extremism, that’s the white whale—trying to understand what makes someone turn violent,” says Bennett Clifford, a senior research fellow at George Washington University’s Program on Extremism. “A lot of it is determined by individual circumstances and vulnerabilities.”

Clifford says he worries about the ways in which January 6 itself, much like 2017’s Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, functioned as an accelerant for extremist views. “The Capitol brought out every single type of domestic violent extremist from throughout the far right—the racially and ethnically motivated folks, the militia/anti-government people, unaffiliated pro-Trump people. When multiple flavors of people gather in one place, stay in the same hotels together, it runs the risk that you get crossovers, the recruitment of previously unaffiliated people by larger groups. Or even if they don’t join the group formally, it can help infuse some new ideology into their worldview. That’s the scariest part of January 6 for me.”

Brian Levin, a criminal justice professor who runs the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, believes part of the solution has to include addressing extremism as a mental health issue. “I’m not saying that this is something that absolves people of criminal responsibility, but when you have broad reservoirs of grievance and unstable or emotionally vulnerable people who are undergoing stressors at the same time, it’s a recipe for radicalization,” he says.

Remember all those stories of how ISIS used social media to radicalize new recruits? Don’t hold your breath waiting for government reports on what made guys like Sabol go rogue. (Or as the Internet called them during the militant standoff at the Malheur national wildlife refuge, Vanilla Isis.) We consider Islamist terrorists unalloyed evil. White ones we think are unstable, emotionally vulnerable, misunderstood, or otherwise stressed.

June 11, 2021 1:49 PM  
Anonymous How soon they forget said...

Vice President Mike Pence address to the US Senate on January 6, 2021:

"Today was a dark day in the history of the United States Capitol. But thanks to the swift efforts of U.S. Capitol Police, federal, state and local law enforcement, the violence was quelled. The Capitol is secured, and the people's work continues.

We condemn the violence that took place here in the strongest possible terms. We grieve the loss of life in these hallowed halls, as well as the injuries suffered by those who defended our Capitol today. And we will always be grateful to the men and women who stayed at their posts to defend this historic place.

To those who wreaked havoc in our Capitol today, you did not win. Violence never wins. Freedom wins. And this is still the people's house. And as we reconvene in this chamber, the world will again witness the resilience and strength of our democracy, for even in the wake of unprecedented violence and vandalism at this Capitol, the elected representatives of the people of the United States have assembled again on the very same day to support and defend the Constitution of the United States.

So may God bless the lost, the injured and the heroes forged on this day. May God bless all who serve here and those who protect this place. And may god bless the United States of America.

Let's get back to work."


https://www.usnews.com/news/elections/articles/2021-01-06/read-mike-pences-statement-to-the-senate-on-the-storming-of-the-capitol

June 13, 2021 10:48 AM  
Anonymous Why don't Republicans believe in the Constitution any more? said...

Ex-Bush Speechwriter Dismantles ‘The Dreams Of Conservatives’ In Scathing Essay

Michael Gerson compared the “contending nightmares” being put forward by both sides of the aisle in his latest column for The Washington Post.

And for ex-President George W. Bush’s former speechwriter, there is no contest.

Gerson said “the dreams of conservatives are currently troubled by ‘wokeness’ and critical race theory” while “the nightmares of progressives are currently dominated by the growth of right-wing authoritarianism and fascism.”

“Both ideologies are ultimately at war with liberal democracy — the pursuit of a common good, the practice of incremental reform, the cultivation of social trust and the acceptance of democratic outcomes,” he wrote.

But there’s “no question” about “which nightmare is currently most likely to be implemented.”

Gerson continued:

“Only one of these nightmares has taken over a major political party, which is in the process of purging all dissent. Only one of these delusions is the governing vision of a former president who just might be president again. Only one of these developments has turned the backbones of the minority leader of the House, the minority leader of the Senate and almost every other Republican leader into gelatinous goo. Only one of these ideologies produced a crowd that sacked the U.S. Capitol and threatened violence against political leaders. Only one of these movements is working in state legislatures across the country to make electoral systems more vulnerable to manipulation and mob rule.”

All challenges to democracy “are not equal,” Gerson concluded.

“Right-wing authoritarianism is the force that could undo the American system. In a contest of nightmares, it is not even a contest.”

Full Essay:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/06/14/wokeness-fascism-nightmare-threatens-democracy/

June 15, 2021 7:17 AM  
Anonymous ol' Philadelphia said...

the Supreme Court ruled against mandatory homosexuality today

June 17, 2021 5:14 PM  
Anonymous Barack Obama said...

Barack Obama
@BarackObama
·
Today, the Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act. Again. This ruling reaffirms what we have long known to be true: the Affordable Care Act is here to stay.


Barack Obama
@BarackObama
·
The principle of universal coverage has been established, and 31 million people now have access to care through the law we passed—with millions more who can no longer be denied coverage or charged more because of a preexisting condition.


Barack Obama
@BarackObama
·
Now we need to build on the Affordable Care Act and continue to strengthen and expand it. That’s what
@POTUS Biden has done through the American Rescue Plan, giving more families the peace of mind they deserve.


Barack Obama
@BarackObama
·
And because he extended the special enrollment period until August 15th, anyone who needs coverage can go to https://www.healthcare.gov and sign up.

June 17, 2021 5:35 PM  
Anonymous take your damn mask off! said...

the Affordable Car Act sucks

the people supposedly helped can't afford the ridiculous co-pays and deductibles

just because it hasn't been deemed unconstitutional, doesn't mean it's a good idea

June 17, 2021 6:37 PM  
Anonymous The Supreme Court wasn't paying attention said...

Given the Catholic Church's long history of abusing children and harboring pedophiles, they are the last ones that should be allowed to have access to children.

June 18, 2021 6:30 AM  
Anonymous Amy Coney Barrett. lots of laughs! said...

why would the homosexuals in the Catholic Church be assumed to be different than any other homosexuals?

Advocates of equal rights for same-sex couples feared the worst when the Supreme Court agreed to hear the appeal of a Catholic agency that faced the loss of its city contract because it declined to work with gay and lesbian prospective foster parents. On Thursday, the justices ruled for the agency.

The court held that the city of Philadelphia violated the 1st Amendment rights of Catholic Social Services when it barred the agency from screening the parents. Citing its religious beliefs about marriage, the Catholic agency had refused to work with same-sex couples. (The agency also wouldn't certify unmarried heterosexual couples as foster parents.)

The case of Fulton vs. City of Philadelphia, growing out of a lawsuit filed by Catholic Social Services and three foster parents affiliated with the agency, was viewed by religious conservatives and civil rights groups alike as a major ruling on how the court would balance anti-discrimination protections for gays and lesbians with religious freedom. In prohibiting the Catholic agency from screening prospective foster parents, Philadelphia officials cited a city ordinance outlawing discrimination in public accommodations as well as nondiscrimination language in the contract.

June 18, 2021 7:08 AM  
Anonymous The times they are a changin' said...

There you go again, trying to conflate Catholic pedophilia with homosexuality.

It didn't work when you were trying to stop gay marriages, and it won't work any better now.

Fortunately, there are some positive trends pointing toward a better future:

U.S. Church Membership Falls Below Majority for First Time
BY JEFFREY M. JONES

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Americans' membership in houses of worship continued to decline last year, dropping below 50% for the first time in Gallup's eight-decade trend. In 2020, 47% of Americans said they belonged to a church, synagogue or mosque, down from 50% in 2018 and 70% in 1999.

U.S. church membership was 73% when Gallup first measured it in 1937 and remained near 70% for the next six decades, before beginning a steady decline around the turn of the 21st century.

As many Americans celebrate Easter and Passover this week, Gallup updates a 2019 analysis that examined the decline in church membership over the past 20 years.

Gallup asks Americans a battery of questions on their religious attitudes and practices twice each year. The following analysis of declines in church membership relies on three-year aggregates from 1998-2000 (when church membership averaged 69%), 2008-2010 (62%), and 2018-2020 (49%). The aggregates allow for reliable estimates by subgroup, with each three-year period consisting of data from more than 6,000 U.S. adults.

The decline in church membership is primarily a function of the increasing number of Americans who express no religious preference. Over the past two decades, the percentage of Americans who do not identify with any religion has grown from 8% in 1998-2000 to 13% in 2008-2010 and 21% over the past three years.

As would be expected, Americans without a religious preference are highly unlikely to belong to a church, synagogue or mosque, although a small proportion -- 4% in the 2018-2020 data -- say they do. That figure is down from 10% between 1998 and 2000.

Given the nearly perfect alignment between not having a religious preference and not belonging to a church, the 13-percentage-point increase in no religious affiliation since 1998-2000 appears to account for more than half of the 20-point decline in church membership over the same time.

Most of the rest of the drop can be attributed to a decline in formal church membership among Americans who do have a religious preference. Between 1998 and 2000, an average of 73% of religious Americans belonged to a church, synagogue or mosque. Over the past three years, the average has fallen to 60%.

Generational Differences Linked to Change in Church Membership

Church membership is strongly correlated with age, as 66% of traditionalists -- U.S. adults born before 1946 -- belong to a church, compared with 58% of baby boomers, 50% of those in Generation X and 36% of millennials. The limited data Gallup has on church membership among the portion of Generation Z that has reached adulthood are so far showing church membership rates similar to those for millennials.

The decline in church membership, then, appears largely tied to population change, with those in older generations who were likely to be church members being replaced in the U.S. adult population with people in younger generations who are less likely to belong. The change has become increasingly apparent in recent decades because millennials and Gen Z are further apart from traditionalists in their church membership rates (about 30 points lower) than baby boomers and Generation X are (eight and 16 points, respectively). Also, each year the younger generations are making up an increasingly larger part of the entire U.S. adult population.

Still, population replacement doesn't fully explain the decline in church membership, as adults in the older generations have shown roughly double-digit decreases from two decades ago. Church membership is down even more, 15 points, in the past decade among millennials.

June 18, 2021 7:30 AM  
Anonymous Another Rump failure said...

WASHINGTON — Former President Donald Trump promised to repeal Obamacare, the health insurance program that helped fuel the backlash tea party movement and ultimately his own candidacy.

If Trump couldn't get Congress to do away with the law — and he couldn't, even with Republicans in control of both chambers — he would choose Supreme Court justices who would declare Obamacare unconstitutional.

"If I win the presidency, my judicial appointments will do the right thing unlike Bush's appointee John Roberts on Obamacare," Trump tweeted in 2015, referring to the decision Roberts wrote that preserved the law's mandate for Americans to buy health insurance.

But two of the three jurists Trump picked for the court — Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett — voted with Roberts as part of a 7-2 majority Thursday to deny standing to a group of conservative states that claimed the law harmed them. It was a major blow — perhaps a decisive one — against the political right's long fight against Obamacare and a sign of the limit of Trump's influence on the justices he appointed.

In the first hours after the ruling, Trump greeted the news with the deafening silence of defeat.

And as President Joe Biden and Democratic congressional leaders scrambled to put out statements in praise of the ruling, most Republicans followed Trump's lead by refusing to give it any extra attention.

Rather than speak individually, House Republican leaders put out a joint news release. In a break with Trump's style, they refrained from attacking the court or its decision while highlighting their distaste for Obamacare, which is formally titled the Affordable Care Act.

"While the Supreme Court ruled today that states do not have standing to challenge the mandate, the ruling does not change the fact that Obamacare failed to meet its promises and is hurting hard-working American families," House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., Minority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., and Conference Chair Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y., said in their statement. "Now, Congress must work together to improve American health care."

There was no promise to renew the fight to repeal the law or to mount another court battle over its constitutionality.

House Republicans remember Democrats' hammering them over the repeal effort in the 2018 midterms and easily winning control of the House. Now, as they look to take power back, Republicans aren't at all interested in fighting to take health insurance benefits away from millions of Americans.

nly two justices — Samuel Alito and Trump appointee Neil Gorsuch — departed from the majority's opinion Wednesday, which essentially held that the states had no standing to sue because they wouldn't be harmed by an insurance mandate that the justices said is unenforceable. It's unenforceable because Trump and Congress eliminated the law's penalty for people who decline to buy health insurance.

"Unsurprisingly, the States have not demonstrated that an unenforceable mandate will cause their residents to enroll in valuable benefits programs that they would otherwise forgo," Justice Stephen Breyer wrote for the majority. Justice Clarence Thomas, siding with the majority, wrote a separate concurring opinion.

In the end, Trump was wrong about the law, the politics of trying to kill the Affordable Care Act — and the assumption that he could control the votes of his Supreme Court picks.

June 18, 2021 7:46 AM  
Anonymous Rump finally admitted a critical fact: “We didn’t win.” -- He's a little s l o w said...

Amid a rambling, off-the-rails phone interview with Sean Hannity on Fox News, former President Donald Trump finally admitted a critical fact: “We didn’t win.”

It was the first time since the presidential election more than seven months ago that Trump has conceded to his successor, President Joe Biden. But he also ominously warned: “Let’s see what happens on that.”

Trump told Hannity Wednesday night: “Shockingly, we were supposed to win easily at 64 million votes, and we got 75 million votes, and we didn’t win. But let’s see what happens on that.”

Trump actually won 74.2 million votes to Biden’s 81.2 million votes. Biden also won the Electoral College 306-232.

June 18, 2021 8:00 AM  
Anonymous homosexuality never produces life, two of 'em ain't ever a marriage said...

"The pandemic is raging, and with unvaccinated people going into crowds without masks you can be sure we will see a spike in infections,"

that was TTF over a month ago

keep it in mind when they state things with such certainty

"There you go again, trying to conflate Catholic pedophilia with homosexuality."

that's factual

there are few cases of fake priests molesting young girls

but there are many cases of homosexuals pretending to be priests and molesting young boys

the term for same sex attraction, in English, is homosexuality

"It didn't work when you were trying to stop gay marriages, and it won't work any better now."

I didn't do a thing to try and stop gay "marriage"

I just called it what it is: an oxymoron, promoted by political morons

"Trump actually won 74.2 million votes to Biden’s 81.2 million votes. Biden also won the Electoral College 306-232."

both were the largest vote totals in US history

there is no way to tell if it was legitimate because all policies to protect voting integrity were eliminated, with the pandemic claimed as a rationale

but it's suspicious that Dems are working so hard to block voter integrity policies now

you'd almost think they had something to hide

June 19, 2021 3:54 PM  
Anonymous Prove it said...

"you'd almost think they had something to hide"

That's what Rump claimed in every court he could and every court ruled against his wasteful bogus attempts to steal the election from Joe Biden, the rightful and certified winner of the 2020 US Presidential election.

June 19, 2021 5:17 PM  
Anonymous homosexual marriage is an inherently sado-masochistic arrangement that should be discouraged by any civilized society said...

courts can't make a finding without evidence

the Dems made sure none existed

Al Capone did the same, which is why he could only be convicted of tax evasion

the Dems have been going ballistic at the very idea of policies to insure the integrity of voting

the notion that asking everyone to show ID to vote favors whites and disfavors blacks is a lot of things, such as idiotic, demagogic, but more than anything, it's racist

why are Dems fighting so hard against voter integrity policies?

you'd almost think they had something to hide

June 19, 2021 10:10 PM  
Anonymous They're called gay marriages because they're so much happier said...

"the term for same sex attraction, in English, is homosexuality"

Check the dictionary:

ho·mo·sex·u·al·i·ty
/ˌhōməˌsekSHəˈwalədē/
noun: homosexuality; plural noun: homosexualities
the quality or characteristic of being sexually attracted solely to people of one's own sex.

pe·do·phil·i·a
/ˌpēdəˈfilēə,ˌpedəˈfilēə/
noun: paedophilia; noun: pedophilia
sexual feelings directed toward children.

"but there are many cases of homosexuals pretending to be priests and molesting young boys"

No, there were many cases of *ACTUAL* priests committing acts of pedophilia against their most readily available targets. But if you ever find evidence of a gay guy actually pretending to be a priest before molesting children, feel free to share it with us.

Homosexuals were actively purged from the church pews and the clergy, while pedophile priests were actively protected and hidden from the police, sometimes even being sent to other countries to avoid prosecution:

https://www.propublica.org/article/dozens-of-catholic-priests-credibly-accused-of-abuse-found-work-abroad-some-with-the-churchs-blessing

"ProPublica and the Chronicle analyzed lists published by 52 U.S. dioceses — encompassing the top 30 in terms of the number of credibly accused living clergy and those located in states along the U.S.-Mexico border. Reporters found 51 clergy who after allegations of abuse in the U.S. were able to work as priests or religious brothers in a host of countries, from Ireland to Nigeria to the Philippines. At least 40 had worked in U.S. states along the southern border, including 11 in Texas. No country was a more common destination than Mexico, where at least 21 credibly accused clergy found refuge."

Little girls were abused too, and Pope Benedict had to shut down an entire congregation of nuns that were being used as sex slaves by priests. The Catholic Church has been a hotbed of sexual abuse of both genders for decades, but you only bring up the little boys because it furthers your anti-gay agenda - with no mention at all of the Magdalene Laundries - where girls and women of all ages - some raped by priests - were kept as slave labor until the last one was closed down in 1996.

https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/people/magdalene-survivor-i-was-raped-by-a-priest-i-want-to-tell-my-story-it-is-with-me-always-1.4023697

It is quite easy to find cases of sexual abuse by Catholic priests, bishops, nuns, or even cardinals - often, but not always against children, of both the heterosexual and homosexual variety.

You like to keep highlighting only their "homosexual" abuses as if homosexuality was the cause or source of that abuse. But if you look for institutional cases of abuse by major gay groups, it just isn't there. It's funny how a large gay organizations can operate for decades without a child abuse scandal but the Catholic Church can not.

The problem is the church - not gay people.

"I didn't do a thing to try and stop gay "marriage"

You are only deluding yourself.

June 20, 2021 10:02 AM  
Anonymous Merrick Garland ... LOL !.. said...

There have been few things more glorious to witness in recent weeks than the impressive array of courageous and relentless mothers around the country lambasting school boards for their support of vile critical race theory.

These moms of different socioeconomic, racial, ethnic, and religious backgrounds are confronting and boldly holding to account school board members, administrators, and teachers who are indoctrinating innocent children with a destructive ideology.

They understand perhaps better than anyone that Marxist-infused curricula intended to sow division and resentment have no place in a free and civilized society, and is endangering their children’s cognitive, psychological, and emotional well-being. It has been an exhilarating display of unity and common decency.

It turns out everyday women don’t want their children being brainwashed to view the world through the lens of “whiteness,” white racism, and white privilege. They don’t agree that America was founded on racist principles. They reject the claim that hard work, self-reliance, objectivity, deferred gratification, family, respect for authority, and respect for the written word are intrinsically racist values exploited by white Americans to relentlessly suppress people of color.

Mothers resent their children being defined as a collective based on race, gender and sexuality, and being told that their achievement in life is determined by these fixed categories as opposed to their endeavors. They don’t like the glorification of organizations like Black Lives Matter that undermine the nuclear family and promote violence against police.

Crucially, they intuit that when school curricula present as fact a pseudo-academic theory that is entirely unsupported by empirical data, and that ipso facto precludes criticism and dissent, students are being propagandized, not educated. Now, protective instincts are kicking in and moms are fighting back.

https://thefederalist.com/2021/06/21/moms-must-keep-hammering-school-boards-until-critical-race-theory-is-dead/

June 22, 2021 6:31 AM  
Anonymous government is not the solution to our problems, government is the problem said...

"Check the dictionary:

ho·mo·sex·u·al·i·ty
/ˌhōməˌsekSHəˈwalədē/
noun: homosexuality; plural noun: homosexualities
the quality or characteristic of being sexually attracted solely to people of one's own sex."

I said "the term for same sex attraction, in English, is homosexuality"

whatever dictionary you're using agrees with my definition so I don't know why you're reposting

"No, there were many cases of *ACTUAL* priests committing acts of pedophilia against their most readily available targets. But if you ever find evidence of a gay guy actually pretending to be a priest before molesting children, feel free to share it with us."

any priest that engages in homosexuality is a fake priest, by definition

his ordination vows were false because homosexuality is in opposition to Roman Catholic doctrine

"Homosexuals were actively purged from the church pews and the clergy,"

that's false

part of the problem is that the Catholic is too tolerant of homosexuality in its clergy, perhaps because there is a shortage of heterosexuals willing to take a vow of celibacy

as for the "pews", you're completely wrong

"while pedophile priests were actively protected and hidden from the police, sometimes even being sent to other countries to avoid prosecution"

another problem with the Catholic church is they tend to deal with sin among its clergy internally even when the sin involved is also a crime

that's true for all crime, not just the homosexuals pretending to be priests who take advantage of teen boys when the priests are in a position of authority

"Little girls were abused too,"

no one is excusing that but it isn't as common as homosexual "priest" abuse of teen boys

the problem is closeted homosexuals who pretend to be priests and, being installed, are tempted by situations where they have an opportunity to take advantage of teen boys in their charge

"but you only bring up the little boys because it furthers your anti-gay agenda"

actually, I didn't bring up the topic

I noted the Supreme Court has ruled that Catholic adoption agencies don't have to place children with homosexual couples and a vile TTFer said:

"Given the Catholic Church's long history of abusing children and harboring pedophiles, they are the last ones that should be allowed to have access to children."

TTF brought the subject up, I simply responded with the facts

"You like to keep highlighting only their "homosexual" abuses as if homosexuality was the cause or source of that abuse."

people can draw their own conclusions

fact is, homosexuals hide out in the Catholic priesthood, where they think their lack of interest in the opposite sex won't be suspicious, and they are tempted when they are in charge of teen boys

it's not complicated

"But if you look for institutional cases of abuse by major gay groups, it just isn't there"

I haven't looked

I do remember scandals years ago when some gay rights leaders were involved in NAMBLA, but that was long ago

"The problem is the church - not gay people"

the Catholic church should handle it all differently but the problem is the homosexuals who commit the acts, not the institution

stop excusing evil

June 22, 2021 7:06 AM  
Anonymous the gay agenda is totalitarian said...

Trump didn't violate any rights in walking across the street during demonstration:

https://www.aol.com/news/judge-tosses-most-claims-over-005534497-124539327.html

June 22, 2021 12:03 PM  
Anonymous Happily married heterosexuals don't obsess over gay marriages said...

"whatever dictionary you're using agrees with my definition so I don't know why you're reposting"

I posted the definitions to highlight the fact that the definition of homosexuality doesn't include children. The one for pedophilia does.

But that is a distinction you always ignore as it provides you a convenient excuse for perpetually conflating gays with pedophiles. It's a key strategy of your compulsive anti-gay propaganda.

"as for the "pews", you're completely wrong"

Just ask some ex-Catholic gays why they left the church and you'll find otherwise.

"his ordination vows were false because homosexuality is in opposition to Roman Catholic doctrine"

Priests have committed a whole litany of crimes that go against the 10 commandments, any sense of moral decency and Catholic doctrine. Plenty of these crimes were committed by straight men. That doesn't mean they are "fake priests."

You are trying to use the excuse of a vow to invoke the "no true Scotsman" logical fallacy. That doesn't make it any less of a fallacy.

"the Catholic church should handle it all differently but the problem is the homosexuals who commit the acts, not the institution"

No, the problem IS the Catholic institution. The only other institutions that have sexually abused so many people of all genders and ages typically happen to be armies invading / occupying territories. The Catholic church got away with it for decades using a variety of psychological indoctrination, payoffs, and control tactics, did the crimes behind closed doors, and kept their victims quiet.

"fact is, homosexuals hide out in the Catholic priesthood, where they think their lack of interest in the opposite sex won't be suspicious, and they are tempted when they are in charge of teen boys"

The more obvious and direct explanation is that pedophiles hide out in the priesthood, knowing full well that a priest's position and the indoctrination of children to follow God, Jesus, and church commands aligns perfectly with their need to "groom" children, and gives them more opportunities than just about any other profession - excluding "cult leader" of course.

Gay men have found partners in large cities for decades (probably centuries) that they can quietly have relationships without ever risking jail time for pedophilia - and they have far more control over their lives and interests, and more choices for partners than they would ever have stuck working for the Church. Then of course, a gay man doesn't have to "groom" his latest partner for months before he can have sex without being worried about a child telling his or her parents what happened.

Your contrived "explanation" doesn't hold a lot of holy water.

June 22, 2021 2:16 PM  
Anonymous Happily married heterosexuals don't obsess over gay marriages said...

The RICO statute should have been used years ago to prosecute the Catholic church, all of its sexual predators, and the clergy that hid them or moved them to escape prosecution.

For those who don't recall what RICO is:

Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO)

Passed in 1970, the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) is a federal law designed to combat organized crime in the United States. It allows prosecution and civil penalties for racketeering activity performed as part of an ongoing criminal enterprise. Such activity may include illegal gambling, bribery, kidnapping, murder, money laundering, counterfeiting, embezzlement, drug trafficking, slavery, and a host of other unsavory business practices.

June 22, 2021 2:20 PM  
Anonymous Biden beat Rump said...

"Trump didn't violate any rights in walking across the street during demonstration"

Well that's one judge's opinion.

His name is Judge Dabney L. Friedrich and he was nominated to the court by Former President Bonespurs.

So it was a big surprise to you he'd cover Rump's and Barr's butts while leaving MPD and APD responsible for following their orders, huh?

Interesting.

"Friedrich dismissed the claims against Barr and other federal officials, including the acting U.S. Park Police chief, Gregory Monahan, finding there wasn’t sufficient evidence to prove there was any agreement or plan to violate the rights of the protesters. The judge also said the law gives them immunity in civil litigation.

In a 51-page decision, the judge did allow the claims against the Metropolitan Police Department and the Arlington Police Department — their officers were involved in clearing the park — to proceed. "

Time will tell if Judge Friedrich's decision holds.

After all just recently "A [full] federal appeals court decided Monday to put on hold a judge’s decision to overturn California’s 30-year-old ban on assault weapons, but the legal fight could continue for months and may be decided by the U.S. Supreme Court.

In a brief order, a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals issued a stay of Judge Roger T. Benitez’s (a Dumbya appointee) June 4 decision, in which he likened an AR-15 semiautomatic to a Swiss Army knife and called it “good for both home and battle.”

Benitez’s decision overturning the California ban gave the state 30 days to challenge the decision. The 9th Circuit, acting on a June 10 appeal filed by Atty. Gen. Rob Bonta, put Benitez’s ruling on hold pending decisions in other gun cases that are now before the court.

“This leaves our assault weapons laws in effect while appellate proceedings continue,” Bonta said in a tweet. “We won’t stop defending these life-saving laws.”

The 9th Circuit judges on the panel issuing the stay were Barry G. Silverman, an appointee of President Clinton; Jacqueline Nguyen, an Obama appointee; and Ryan D. Nelson, a Trump appointee."

Oh yeah, those assault weapons come in real handy around the house, don't they!

June 22, 2021 2:44 PM  
Anonymous I wonder if TTFers agree with any part of the Constitution.... said...

When Joe Biden entered office he said his goal was to vaccinate 100 million in 100 days

Mission accomplished

But when he entered office, the US was already vaccinating a million a day

So, Trump would actually be the one who got it accomplished

Biden did later make a goal that would be all his: vaccinate 70% by July 4th

ooooops!

looks like he failed:

The Biden administration said earlier Tuesday that it likely won't hit President Joe Biden's goal of getting 70% of American adults to receive one vaccine shot or more by the Fourth of July.

June 22, 2021 3:08 PM  
Anonymous Brett Kavanaugh...LOL!! We got something to laugh about! said...

"I posted the definitions to highlight the fact that the definition of homosexuality doesn't include children. The one for pedophilia does."

fascinating...

the pedophiles in the Catholic priesthood are mostly homosexuals, by a wide margin

your attempts to obscure that are futile

"But that is a distinction you always ignore as it provides you a convenient excuse for perpetually conflating gays with pedophiles. It's a key strategy of your compulsive anti-gay propaganda."

I simply pointed out the correlation

people can draw their conclusions

"Just ask some ex-Catholic gays why they left the church and you'll find otherwise."

if they left because of Catholic teaching, that's not a "purge"

"Priests have committed a whole litany of crimes that go against the 10 commandments, any sense of moral decency and Catholic doctrine. Plenty of these crimes were committed by straight men. That doesn't mean they are "fake priests.""

it's fake when they take a vow they don't believe

"You are trying to use the excuse of a vow to invoke the "no true Scotsman" logical fallacy. That doesn't make it any less of a fallacy."

no I'm not

"No, the problem IS the Catholic institution."

the problem is the homosexuals that pretend to believe something they don't

"Gay men have found partners in large cities for decades (probably centuries) that they can quietly have relationships without ever risking jail time for pedophilia - and they have far more control over their lives and interests, and more choices for partners than they would ever have stuck working for the Church."

if so, then the homosexuals hiding out in the Catholic priesthood may have not been aware of it

they likely feel they have more chance being found out in a gay bar than a parsonage

"For those who don't recall what RICO is:"

it's a statute abused by prosecutors and applied in ways legislators never intended

"Well that's one judge's opinion."

it's also Merrick Garland's opinion

June 22, 2021 11:45 PM  
Anonymous Happily married heterosexuals don't obsess over gay marriages said...

"if they left because of Catholic teaching, that's not a "purge"

Perhaps semantically, but the end result is the same - the gays left the church.


"the problem is the homosexuals that pretend to believe something they don't"

You have no idea what they believe - you can't guess their intentions, motivations, or sincerity. You are not an omnipotent God. And frankly what they believe or pretend to believe really isn't the problem.

The problem is the ACTIONS of the Catholic Church. When some is accused of abusing a child, that should be immediately reported to the police, and all evidence that may support or contradict that claim should be handed over as well.

The problem isn't what they BELIEVE - the problem is them actively hiding pedophile priests from prosecution. Prosecute those people, put them away and children and the churches are a lot better off.

"they likely feel they have more chance being found out in a gay bar than a parsonage"

Conjecture. Again, you have no idea what people think or what motivates them. Much of your arguments depend on guessing or accusing people of motivations that you simply can not know or prove.

But then again religions are based on entire collections of ideas that people can't know or prove, and then telling stories to convince people to believe them. Perhaps I shouldn't be surprised your droningly repetitive narrative sounds a lot like a religion.

June 23, 2021 10:03 AM  
Anonymous the gay agenda is totalitarian said...

"Perhaps semantically, but the end result is the same - the gays left the church."

it's not semantics

"purging" is being forced out

if someone leaves because they don't agree with the teaching, it's their own choice

those teachings, btw, have been consistent over the millennia

"You have no idea what they believe - you can't guess their intentions, motivations, or sincerity. You are not an omnipotent God."

you don't have to be God to make reasonable inferences

it doesn't stop you from making all manner of inferences about me, reasonable or not

"And frankly what they believe or pretend to believe really isn't the problem."

frankly, it is

because, if they believed what they claimed to believe during their ordination vows, they'd never have done what they did

"The problem is the ACTIONS of the Catholic Church. When some is accused of abusing a child, that should be immediately reported to the police, and all evidence that may support or contradict that claim should be handed over as well."

they thought they should handle it internally

probably a mistake but it's not the real problem

it's that some homosexuals posed as priests and used the authority they gained by their ruse to abuse teen boys

"The problem isn't what they BELIEVE - the problem is them actively hiding pedophile priests from prosecution. Prosecute those people, put them away and children and the churches are a lot better off."

probably should have, but they aren't alone

it's a natural tendency for any group or organization

"Conjecture. Again, you have no idea what people think or what motivates them. Much of your arguments depend on guessing or accusing people of motivations that you simply can not know or prove."

everybody makes such conclusions about what's likely

most people would think they are safer from disclosure behind the walls of a parsonage than in public at a gay bar

it's just common sense

"But then again religions are based on entire collections of ideas that people can't know or prove, and then telling stories to convince people to believe them. Perhaps I shouldn't be surprised your droningly repetitive narrative sounds a lot like a religion."

I'm not a Catholic

I'm just defending their right to their beliefs

you might want to consider a commitment to constitutional beliefs

June 23, 2021 12:29 PM  
Anonymous Dead GOPer voted said...

Republican lawmakers in Ohio pushing for more “safety and security” at the ballot box can now point to a clear example of voter fraud in the November 2020 presidential election.

Unfortunately for them, it involves another Republican.

Edward Snodgrass, who is a Porter Township trustee, has admitted to forging his dead father’s signature on an absentee ballot and then voting again as himself, court records and other sources revealed.

Snodgrass was busted after a Delaware County election worker questioned the signature on his father’s ballot. A subsequent investigation revealed the ballot had been mailed to H. Edward Snodgrass on Oct. 6 — a day after the 78-year-old retired businessman died.

In an interview with NBC News, Snodgrass said he made “an honest error” while struggling to take care of his dying father, who had advanced Parkinson’s disease. He said he had power of attorney for several years and because his dad had broken his right arm he’d already been “signing for him.” He said his dad had requested the absentee ballot.

“It was there with a pile of other paperwork,” Snodgrass said. “I was sleep-deprived and not thinking clearly. But I’m not going to run away from it.”

Snodgrass, 57, declined to say who he voted for but said it would not be accurate to characterize what he did as “just Trump voter fraud.”

“I was simply trying to execute a dying man’s wishes,” he said.

June 23, 2021 1:20 PM  
Anonymous for millennia, society has known that two genders are necessary to make a marriage said...

no matter if it's donkey or pachyderm

it shows what's possible

there is no reason to oppose voter integrity laws

unless you're planning to commit voting fraud

minorities are just as capable of in-person voting as anyone else

no matter: the Dems won't succeed in talking over all voting in the country

June 23, 2021 10:41 PM  
Anonymous the brave speak against lunacy said...

NFL legend Brett Favre has joined the chorus of those opposing transgender weightlifter Laurel Hubbard taking part in the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo.

Earlier this week, the New Zealander became the first ever transgender athlete selected to compete at the Olympics after being included in New Zealand's weightlifting team for the upcoming Tokyo Games. Hubbard, who came out as transgender in 2013, had previously competed in the men's events.

Her selection has proved controversial and Favre was the latest to criticize her inclusion, suggesting Hubbard enjoys an unfair advantage.

"It's a man competing as a woman," the former Green Bay Packers quarterback told co-host Eric Bolling on Tuesday, during the latest episode of the Bolling with Favre podcast.

"That's unfair. It's not fair for a man, even if this person wants to be a woman or feels compelled—if you want to become the opposite sex, that's fine. I got no problem with it. But you can't compete against—males cannot compete against females."

"If I was a true female—I can't believe I'm saying that—and I was competing in weightlifting and lost to this person, I would be beside myself."

Those in favor of preventing transgender women from competing in women's sports note that the male hormones that develop through puberty give transgender "women" an unfair advantage because of the strength they confer

June 24, 2021 10:07 AM  
Anonymous Rudy, Rudy, Rudy said...

https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/20971834-matter-of-giuliani-2021-00506-pc

"We conclude that respondent’s conduct immediately threatens the public interest and warrants interim suspension from the practice of law, pending further proceedings before the Attorney Grievance Committee."

June 24, 2021 12:27 PM  
Anonymous homosexual "marriage" is sado-masochistic said...

it's up to you, New York, New York....

will your Bar Association be a responsible party acting in the public interest or a political entity furthering the liberal agenda?

June 24, 2021 1:37 PM  

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